Most of these subjects will earn you credit points towards your degree.

Spread your workload
You could reduce your study load next session by picking up a subject during summer.

 

Re-take a subject
Summer could be an opportunity to catch up and complete those essential areas of study.

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Aboriginal Sydney Now (013992)

Engaging with contemporary Indigenous culture and seeing Sydney in a new way–if this is something that captures your interest, then Aboriginal Sydney Now should definitely be on your radar. Developed by the Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, Aboriginal Sydney Now focuses on Aboriginal Sydney as a means for exploring current and historical ideas about culture, country and community. By participating in this subject, you will gain a deeper understanding of Indigenous professional capability – a knowledge that will prove valuable throughout your studies and your career.

Aboriginal Sydney Now (013993)

Engaging with contemporary Indigenous culture and seeing Sydney in a new way–if this is something that captures your interest, then Aboriginal Sydney Now should definitely be on your radar. Developed by the Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, Aboriginal Sydney Now focuses on Aboriginal Sydney as a means for exploring current and historical ideas about culture, country and community. By participating in this subject, you will gain a deeper understanding of Indigenous professional capability – a knowledge that will prove valuable throughout your studies and your career.

Academic English: Communication Fundamentals (59720)

Academic English is a specific style of English used at university. You’ll hear it in lectures and tutorials, and you’ll also be expected to use it when you write your assessments, give oral presentations and participate in class discussions. Academic English: Communication Fundamentals has been designed to help you take your language skills to the next level. Perhaps you need some support after achieving Band 1 in OPELA; your tutor has encouraged you to take the subject; or you wish to develop a clear understanding of how academic communication works. Whatever the reason, the subject will give you an introduction to the nature of effective spoken and written communication in academic contexts. 

Academic English: Communication Fundamentals (59721)

Academic English is a specific style of English used at university. You’ll hear it in lectures and tutorials, and you’ll also be expected to use it when you write your assessments, give oral presentations and participate in class discussions. Academic English: Communication Fundamentals has been designed to help you take your language skills to the next level. Perhaps you need some support after achieving Band 1 in OPELA; your tutor has encouraged you to take the subject; or you wish to develop a clear understanding of how academic communication works. Whatever the reason, the subject will give you an introduction to the nature of effective spoken and written communication in academic contexts. 

Accounting for Business Decisions B (22207)

This subject develops students’ understanding and application of accounting information in more complex business scenarios; partnerships and companies. It also develops the use of accounting information internally by management, expanding the factors needed to be considered including the skills to facilitate and enhance decision making, accountability and control. Ethical implications of decisions are considered throughout the subject.

Accounting for Managerial Decisions (22747)

This subject aims to expose students to the nature and use of accounting information as used by managers to plan and control business operations as well as for decision support. The subject is intended to prepare students to understand and use accounting information for decision support, analysing historical operations and planning future business activity. It provides a sound grounding in the application of accounting concepts and techniques used to gain intelligence about all aspects of business operations.
The topics comprise a mix of financial and management accounting. The financial accounting topics concern the basic financial statements, their analysis, and the concepts and procedures that underpin their preparation. The management accounting topics relate to cost and profit planning, and the use and application of financial information to support management decision activity for both routine and non-routine business situations.

Accounting for New Ventures (22910)

This subject, partially delivered online, develops accounting knowledge and skills for entrepreneurs. The topics covered provide a basic understanding of accounting concepts and help plan and deliver accounting related aspects for early ventures and small businesses. Students learn how to read and interpret accounting and financial statements, analyse financial performance, develop budgets and manage cash flows.

Advanced Building Regulation (15615)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Analogue Photography (88011)

This subject introduces students to working with film cameras and the black and white darkroom. It offers a hands-on and immersive experience of making photographs. Building on, and complementing, prerequisite understandings of manual camera functions and image design, students explore analogue practices of film exposure and development, print enlargement and experimental darkroom techniques.

Analytics Capstone Project B (31243)

Data mining and knowledge discovery is the kernel of contemporary computer analytics and intelligence. The process consists of several iterative steps, including data pre-processing and transformation, the actual data mining and pattern discovery steps, and putting discovered information and knowledge into action.
This subject is focused on the practical implementation of this process to large data sets from different areas of human endeavour. Students choose a real-world project of interest and, with the help of a staff mentor, research, plan and produce an outcome. They communicate the results of the project in a detailed report.

Anatomical Pathology (91402)

This subject is part of an accredited degree and as part of that certification requires specific subject content. Students gain a basic knowledge of disease processes, the body’s responses to them, and the light microscopic appearance of diseased tissues known as general pathology. This knowledge is further enhanced by authentic practice done in the laboratory using different dyes to highlight these disease processes in tissue sections used to assist diagnosis. These practical classes consolidate the learned theory by examining tissue sections with the maladies studied as well as the staining of tissues for specific hallmarks of these tissue disorders to assist in coming to a differential diagnosis. This subject assumes a solid knowledge of histology and basic stain theory learned in 91500 Histology, functions of the human body from 91400 Human Anatomy and Physiology and ties together all previously learned subjects, to present a deeper understanding of how the body responds to injurious stimuli. The graduating student is provided with a skill base to discriminate between normal and diseased tissue required for postgraduate study, work in hospital or private pathology laboratories, as medical representative for pharmaceutical or medical equipment firm or to undertake medical research and forensic investigations of human remains.

Applied Company Law (79014)

This subject is designed for business students to provide them with a sound understanding of fundamental aspects of company law and regulations as they apply to the modern company. Students learn to identify the legal issues, liabilities and risk which may arise in their business practice and solutions to minimise legal risk. This subject emphasises the realities of the company in a changing commercial world, and how the Australian legal framework has evolved in response to political and socioeconomic change.
Through seminar discussion questions and hypothetical legal problem questions, students follow the progression of the modern company life cycle, from its startup and the possibilities of alternative business structures; expansion to a limited liability company, including the laws that govern the external and internal relationship between the company and its directors and shareholders; the directors’ and officers’ duties and the role of corporate regulators; the raising of equity and debt; company accounts and audit; and finally companies in difficulty and the end of the company life cycle.

This subject is taught from a student-centred perspective where student responsibility for their learning is an essential component. Learning involves active engagement with the subject’s content through podcasts, seminars and a range of online exercises.

Applied Human Fieldwork Placement (78293)

This subject involves a placement with 40K Globe together with academic learning about human rights law, and social and economic rights in particular. 40K Globe is a unique internship that offers students the chance to spend one month in rural India helping local villagers develop a sustainable solution for better access to education and employment. Students work in teams with students from other faculties and universities on a social impact project provided by 40K Globe in consultation with local communities.
This subject links the study of human rights law with the practical implementation of social and economic rights, and the right to development. This equips students with an understanding of and critical thinking about the role and value of human rights in the context of a developing country. It also promotes cross-cultural awareness, adaptability and collaborative practices, and encourages self-awareness and ethical behaviour. The subject, like other internship subjects, provides a valuable supplement to students’ academic program that can enrich and enliven the classroom experience. As an international practical subject it also prepares students for global professional practice, particularly in the development and human rights fields.

The subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of ethical judgment, critical reflection and professional responsibility through the following three components: self-study – through selected readings students examine certain topics of relevance to the practical component (the right to development, economic and social rights, and the practice of human rights), providing both a fundamental level of knowledge in each area and the ability to apply that knowledge to their experience in the field practical experience – four-week 40K Globe program where students work on a social impact project focused on health, education, employment, energy, food, water or other specific needs reflective journal – students consider the application of their legal knowledge to their practical experience by writing a critical reflection based on the first two components of the subject.

Applied Human Rights Fieldwork (76099)

This subject involves a placement with 40K Globe together with academic learning about human rights law, and social and economic rights in particular. 40K Globe is a unique internship that offers students the chance to spend one month in rural India helping local villagers develop a sustainable solution for better access to education and employment. Students work in teams with students from other faculties and universities on a social impact project provided by 40K Globe in consultation with local communities.
This subject links the study of human rights law with the practical implementation of social and economic rights, and the right to development. This equips students with an understanding of and critical thinking about the role and value of human rights in the context of a developing country. It also promotes cross-cultural awareness, adaptability and collaborative practices, and encourages self-awareness and ethical behaviour. The subject, like other internship subjects, provides a valuable supplement to students’ academic program that can enrich and enliven the classroom experience. As an international practical subject it also prepares students for global professional practice, particularly in the development and human rights fields.

The subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of ethical judgment, critical reflection and professional responsibility through the following three components: self-study – through selected readings students examine certain topics of relevance to the practical component (the right to development, economic and social rights, and the practice of human rights), providing both a fundamental level of knowledge in each area and the ability to apply that knowledge to their experience in the field practical experience – four-week 40K Globe program where students work on a social impact project focused on health, education, employment, energy, food, water or other specific needs reflective journal – students consider the application of their legal knowledge to their practical experience by writing a critical reflection based on the first two components of the subject.

Architecture Special Project (11307)

This subject develops the tool of drawing as a powerful disciplinary device in architecture, to both explore design ideas (creative thinking) as well as to express ideas to others (communication). Through different exercises, the student develops the skill of creating narratives and the graphic tools to translate them into powerful, communicative drawings. During the process, the tool of drawing itself is explored as a medium to manage complexity and connect the world of ideas with their form. Students gain an understanding of the narrative building process, its graphical translation, and the capability to generate graphic documents to express intentional information both accurate and suggestive, operative and seductive; skills to be applied on subsequent design studios as well as in professional architectural practice.

Architecture Special Project UG (Communications) (11320)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Design) (11321)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Global) (11322)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Technology) (11323)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Theory) (11324)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Arguments, Evidence and Intuition (36200)

This subject promotes development of numeracy, quantitative literacy and critical thinking skills. Informed citizens need these skills to participate in discussion of significant issues in culture and society. Using primary research materials, governmental reports, stories, and claims drawn from current media and other sources, participants analyse and identify key features of numerical data and graphical illustrations used to support argument.
By examining the ways that quantitative data can be collected, used and abused as evidence for supporting argument, participants have an opportunity to develop habits of mind and lifelong learning skills that can be applied to the questions that should be asked, as informed citizens, of arguments and the supporting data. Participants apply their skills to construct a narrative that uses graphical and numerical data to tell a story, or support an argument, based on the principles explored in the subject.

Arguments, Evidence and Intuition (36201)

This subject promotes development of numeracy, quantitative literacy and critical thinking skills. Informed citizens need these skills to participate in discussion of significant issues in culture and society. Using primary research materials, governmental reports, stories, and claims drawn from current media and other sources, participants analyse and identify key features of numerical data and graphical illustrations used to support argument.
By examining the ways that quantitative data can be collected, used and abused as evidence for supporting argument, participants have an opportunity to develop habits of mind and lifelong learning skills that can be applied to the questions that should be asked, as informed citizens, of arguments and the supporting data. Participants apply their skills to construct a narrative that uses graphical and numerical data to tell a story, or support an argument, based on the principles explored in the subject.

Assessment and Therapeutics in Health Care 2 (92433)

This subject builds on Assessment and Therapeutics in Health Care 1. Students explore the process of clinical judgement at a foundational level in the care of adults admitted to hospital for elective or emergency surgical procedures. Students are encouraged to develop a holistic approach to facilitate patients’ recovery and discharge to the community. This involves recognition of individuals’ responses to various factors including the presenting Health problem, pre-existing comorbidities, therapeutic interventions and psychosocial factors. Skills in Health assessment; holistic patient-centred and clinical care; professional communication, including clinical handover and documentation, team work, application of evidenced-based practice, Health promotion and Health education, are further developed in the clinical setting.

Audit and Assurance (22011)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Auditing and Assurance Services (22730)

This subject addresses the provision of assurance services. It focuses mainly on the attest services offered by auditors to provide credibility of information in company and other organisational financial statements. The subject studies the audit process of understanding clients’ operations and risks, analytical review, and the pivotal importance of evaluating the quality of client internal control and internal control in a COSO (Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission) framework. The subject provides an understanding of professional, ethical and legal requirements and responsibilities in completing and reporting on assurance tasks. It is accredited by professional accounting bodies.

Australian Civil Liberties Law (76074)

Civil liberties are basic rights and freedoms arising from, and granted to, citizens of a country through constitutional law, the common law or statute. They may also have recognition in international human rights law and include freedom from arbitrary arrest and detention; freedom of speech, assembly and association; freedom of religion; and freedom from discrimination (the right to equality). This subject develops students’ understanding of the fundamentals of civil liberties and human rights in Australia by examining the role, scope and interaction of international human rights law; the Commonwealth Constitution; the common law; and the laws of the Commonwealth, states and territories.
Specific topics considered in this subject include the philosophies and principles which shape Australian civil liberties; the role of federal, state and territory laws in protecting or limiting individual liberties; the institutions established to protect liberties and legal issues arising from their operation; the development of liberties at common law; Australia’s commitments under international conventions and treaties; and issues arising from contemporary social and political conditions.

Students explore aspects of international human rights law, Commonwealth, state and territory laws, analyse legal provisions, and develop a deeper understanding of the interactions between governments and individuals. They learn the language and skills of civil liberties lawyers, including how to identify legal issues concerning human rights; research related legal questions; and approach solving legal problems concerning civil liberties.

Biocomplexity (91123)

The existence of humans on earth has arguably been made possible through the evolution of a vast diversity of biota – to which we are inextricably linked, both directly and indirectly. Earth’s biodiversity is not only extraordinary and fascinating but also fundamental to our ongoing survival. An understanding of the biological complexity of life is an important component underpinning a career in science, irrespective of the chosen scientific profession.
This subject investigates the question: what does it take for life to exist in the range of habitats across the globe? There is considerable variation among living organisms, including humans, in their biology and how they interact with their environment. This subject explores the problems faced by organisms living in different habitats and demonstrates the strategies of plants, animals, fungi, protists, bacteria and archaea that have evolved to cope with the vast array of habitats on earth. The order in which these biota are treated is reflected in the order of the evolution of life, i.e. movement from water to land (and in some cases back again). All major taxa are discussed comparatively to better demonstrate the diversity of evolutionary strategies that have evolved in response to environmental conditions. The subject concludes with considerations of the sustainable use of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria as resources for humans.

Biotechnology Research Project (91539)

In this subject, students undertake a session-long research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. This project is equivalent in level to those undertaken by honours and research master’s students.
The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (10,000-20,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.

Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Biotechnology Research Project B (91538)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Business Internship (21999)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an organisation in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing employment skills, knowledge and contacts which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study (major). A written reflection and report on the outcomes of the internship is required. Students must undertake at least 210 hours of work with a host organisation, which is equivalent to six weeks or 30 days of full-time experience.
The terms and timeframe of the experience are flexible and may be negotiated between the student and host organisation. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives. Students must achieve a minimum overall weighted average mark of 55 to enrol in this subject. It is the responsibility of students to source their own internship. Students must enrol in this subject prior to undertaking an internship.

Business Internship (22999)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an organisation in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing employment skills, knowledge and contacts which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study (major). A written reflection and report on the outcomes of the internship is required. Students must undertake at least 210 hours of work with a host organisation, which is equivalent to six weeks or 30 days of full-time experience.
The terms and time frame of the experience are flexible and may be negotiated between the student and host organisation. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives. Students must achieve a minimum overall weighted average mark of 55 to enrol in this subject. It is the responsibility of students to source their own internship. Students must enrol in this subject prior to undertaking an internship.

Business Internship (23999)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an organisation in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing employment skills, knowledge and contacts which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study (major). A written reflection and report on the outcomes of the internship is required. Students must undertake at least 210 hours of work with a host organisation, which is equivalent to six weeks or 30 days of full-time experience.
The terms and timeframe of the experience are flexible and may be negotiated between the student and host organisation. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives. Students must achieve a minimum overall weighted average mark of 55 to enrol in this subject. It is the responsibility of students to source their own internship. Students must enrol in this subject prior to undertaking an internship.

Business Internship (24999)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an organisation in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing employment skills, knowledge and contacts which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study (major). A written reflection and report on the outcomes of the internship is required. Students must undertake at least 210 hours of work with a host organisation, which is equivalent to six weeks or 30 days of full-time experience.
The terms and timeframe of the experience are flexible and may be negotiated between the student and host organisation. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives. Students must achieve a minimum overall weighted average mark of 55 to enrol in this subject. It is the responsibility of students to source their own internship. Students must enrol in this subject prior to undertaking an internship.

Business Internship (25999)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an organisation in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing employment skills, knowledge and contacts which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study (major). A written reflection and report on the outcomes of the internship is required. Students must undertake at least 210 hours of work with a host organisation, which is equivalent to six weeks or 30 days of full-time experience.
The terms and timeframe of the experience are flexible and may be negotiated between the student and host organisation. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives. Students must achieve a minimum overall weighted average mark of 55 to enrol in this subject. It is the responsibility of students to source their own internship. Students must enrol in this subject prior to undertaking an internship.

Business Statistics (26134)

This subject is designed to develop students’ abilities to assess and critically interpret statistics and business information, and apply them in changing business environments. The subject places strong emphasis on developing a clear theoretical understanding of various analytical tools as well as an appreciation of the application of statistics to business decisions. These skills and competencies provide a foundation for professional practice for further study in the many different majors of the degree.

Business Valuation and Financial Analysis (22743)

The aim of this subject is to demonstrate and apply a framework for business analysis and valuation using financial statement data. The emphasis is on translating the tools of business analysis and valuation into practical situations. To achieve this, the subject is relatively case intensive, with this method used to develop key skills as well as demonstrating their application. The subject is intended for students interested in business consulting, investment banking, business analysis and corporate lending. Given the increasing trend towards a business analysis-based approach to auditing and assurance services, it is also relevant to those interested in public accounting.

Capstone Project Part B (48026)

This subject is intended for students who wish to undertake a 12-credit-point Capstone Project over two sessions. Students enrol in Capstone Project Part A in the first session and this subject in the second.

Chemistry 1 (65111)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Chemistry 2 (65212)

The study of chemistry is central to an understanding of the physical world, and is fundamental to the study of biology, geology and environmental science. This subject builds on and develops further the material introduced in Chemistry 1. The subject is divided into the broad areas of physical chemistry (equilibria, kinetics and thermochemistry) and organic chemistry (carbon compounds and their reactions, including biological molecules such as proteins, sugars and nucleic acids).
The study of physical chemistry allows for the explanation and prediction of chemical reactivity and energetics, while organic chemistry provides the building blocks for understanding the complexity of the natural world.

Chinese Culture and Heritage (97113)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Chinese Festivals and Ceremonies (97111)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Climate Law and Carbon Markets (76041)

This subject examines climate change: one of the most pressing environmental problems of our era. It is a major business issue that is affecting law, policy and corporate behaviour. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that to avoid irreversible harm to the planet, we must stabilise greenhouse gas emissions. This will involve a significant and rapid reduction in ‘business as usual’ behaviours and require unprecedented cooperation at the international level with innovative national responses.
This subject examines the potential role of the international and policy communities as well as the legal and business communities in confronting climate law. It analyses the existing and emerging legal rules and frameworks, both internationally and in Australia, alongside the impacts of these on business and the response from industry. Students critically evaluate the incentives for firms to comply and over-comply with environmental laws and participate in voluntary programs, as well as the role of business in adaptation measures and climate justice issues.

This subject is taught using intensive seminars to enable students to immerse themselves in this exciting field of legal research. It provides students with an early overview of the law and issues in the field, followed by time for in-depth research. In class, learning builds on individual preparation, with class discussions and student co-facilitation forming the basis of each seminar session.

Students practice their oral communication skills in collaboration with their peers, then take responsibility for presenting a topic and leading a discussion exploring options and solutions as a group. In addition, a major research task provides students with practice and feedback on an in-depth exploration of a topic of interest, building their research skills in this dynamic field.

Clinical Bacteriology (91338)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Clinical Practice 3 (96025)

This subject continues the transfer of class-acquired knowledge to real work situations. It consists of one two-week virtual placement and two two-week block placements. The virtual placement includes simulation labs, practical workshops, and online modules in preparation for clinically-oriented settings, such as hospital pharmacy or specialty clinics/services. The block placement sites include patient-care and organisational settings. Students can express a preference to focus their learning in a hospital or community placement, or broaden their experience in a rural, industry or organisational placement setting (subject to availability). Use of an e-portfolio to showcase learning and competency is an important part of this subject.

Commercial Law (70327)

In this subject, students develop an understanding of commercial law. They examine concepts of personal property relevant to commercial law including concepts relating to possession, title and security interests in personal property. Commercial law covers transactions involving personal property including sales or leases, which may also be financed by borrowing.
The subject also examines the application of specific legislation relating to sale of goods, security interests in personal property and consumer protection. Student statutory interpretation skills are reinforced through examination of relevant legislation. The subject also examines how international aspects of transactions are dealt with in domestic and international law.

This subject is taught from a student-centred perspective, with an emphasis on statutory interpretation and case analysis, which may involve lectures, seminars and online learning activities. Reading and discussion are focused on Australian law and cases.

Communicating Difference (54002)

This subject brings together a range of disciplines within communications to examine cultural difference, social identity, frameworks for promoting diversity, and contemporary community formation. In particular, case studies from contemporary Australian society are used to explore themes of racialisation, multiculturalism, gender, sexuality, and class-based inequalities, with a particular focus on Indigenous Australian and settler colonial identities.
Case studies are drawn from a variety of cultural sites that engage with diversity and difference, from popular culture (such as film and television) to institutional diversity policies and social activism. This includes an opportunity to examine Sydney-based initiatives that seek to address marginalisation, promote activism, encourage community participation or extract commercial value from diversity. Through developing original ideas and projects for engaging with diversity and difference, students are invited to reflect upon their own identities from a cultural perspective.

The subject also familiarises students with relevant theories and concepts, critical media studies, critical race and feminist theory, cultural geography, critical diversity studies and organisational studies. In developing frameworks for understanding inequalities, the subject equips students to evaluate the ethical dimensions of contemporary professional practices in diverse working environments.

Communicating with Publics (57023)

In this subject, students analyse the social construction of publics and organisation-public relationships. They study different models of public relations practice and draw on current theories about publics, audience and media to help them understand the development of strategies to communicate with internal and external publics. There is a strong focus on identifying the ethical implications of decisions, actions and outcomes in communicating with publics. Students are encouraged to participate in a discussion on approaches to empowering or influencing publics. The attitudes, knowledges, behaviours and issue positions of various publics are studied to enable students to assess how best to communicate with them. Students learn about different research strategies for understanding communicating with publics.

Companies and Securities Law (77947)

This subject explores company law in its applied context, addressing the needs of business practitioners and professionals such as accountants. The subject comprises four main sections. The first examines the principal provisions affecting the formation and operation of companies. The second concerns the main roles, responsibilities and duties of corporate directors, officers and other employees. The third considers the protection of shareholders, from the process of corporate fundraising through to the issue of new share capital; this section also looks at measures to protect creditors through provisions concerning the maintenance of share capital. The final section contains an introduction to securities regulation and deals with other major events in the corporate lifecycle such as external administration and takeovers.
Specific topics covered in the subject include: the framework of Australian corporations legislation and the role of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission; the process of company registration and its consequences; the range of legal forms of association available for the conduct of business enterprise; the corporate constitution; the company’s liability in contract and under criminal law; the allocation of responsibility between shareholders, directors and company officers; directors’ and officers’ duties and liabilities; minority shareholder protection and remedies; the regulation of major equity capital transactions such as capital reductions, share buy-backs and dividend payments; an introduction to the legal structure of securities market regulation; corporate fundraising; prospectus disclosure obligations and liabilities; external administration of failing companies; voluntary administration, receivership, liquidation and winding up.

an introduction to takeovers law.

The subject seeks to provide an overview of corporate law in Australia highlight the roles, responsibilities and duties of key personnel involved in corporations develop skills in identifying, analysing and understanding corporate legal problems, and build an appreciation of the commercial implications of the legal framework in which corporations operate.

Competition and Consumer Law (79032)

This subject provides a comprehensive and engaging examination of the economic and legal principles of competition law (also known as antitrust law or restrictive trade practices law). and consumer law (also known as deceptive trade practices law) in Australia. It examines statute law, Part IV and Schedule 2 of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (CCA) (formerly the Trade Practices Act (TPA) 1974), the decisions of the common law courts in interpreting the Act, as well as some international treaties on antitrust and consumer law enforcement, of which Australia is a party.
Current issues and recent cases on competition and consumer laws and policies in Australia are also examined. The subject covers the economic functioning of markets; the relationship between the competition and consumer laws (including both statute law and common law) and economics; the evolution and objectives of Australian competition law and consumer law; and the administration and enforcement of competition law and consumer law, both nationally and internationally.

This subject includes three parts. Part I focuses on competition law. It covers the evolution of competition law; the legislative feature of the Australian competition law; major anti-competitive conduct in Part IV of the CCA, such as monopolistic agreements, misuse of market power, mergers/acquisitions; and enforcement issues in Australia, including authorisation and notification regimes, remedies and other related matters. Part II focuses on consumer law. It covers the policy objective of consumer law; general prohibitions in Schedule 2 of the CCA, such as misleading or deceptive conduct, unconscionable conduct, and unfair contract terms; as well as enforcement issues. Part III examines major international treaties on consumer protection and competition enforcement, and some major international cases in which Australia is involved.

Complex Nursing Care: Medical Surgical (92442)

This subject builds on skills introduced in Medical Surgical Nursing and Nursing Care of the Older Person to extend students’ abilities to practise in a range of more complex medical-surgical contexts. Through the use of simulation, students are provided opportunities to work in small nursing teams to make autonomous decisions on caring for patients with complex Health conditions. The importance of comprehensive Health assessment is particularly emphasised along with well-targeted nursing interventions, appropriately planned nursing care and the application of best evidence to practice. Particular attention is paid to recognising and responding to the clinically deteriorating patient. Learning experiences drawing on the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (ACSQHC 2011) and the Essentials of Care program (NSW Health: Nursing and Midwifery Office 2014) focus on providing safe and effective care to individuals and families. At times during this subject, nursing practice is considered in an interprofessional framework. Students also have the opportunity to reflect on their practice and determine self-identified learning needs appropriate to the subject’s focus.

Computational Methods and Model Implementation (25853)

This subject develops skills to solve computational problems arising in quantitative finance. It investigates solutions for risk management, derivatives pricing, equity and yield curve analysis, focusing on model implementation and calibration to market data. Models are implemented on a Microsoft Excel platform (including Visual Basic) and in C++.

Computational Methods and Model Implementation (25871)

This subject develops practical skills to solve computational problems arising in quantitative finance. It investigates solutions for risk management, derivatives pricing, equity and yield curve analysis, focusing on model implementation, estimation and calibration to market data. Models are implemented in a spreadsheet application and in an industry-standard, non-proprietary programming language, using object-oriented and generic programming features. There is a research project component to the subject which is undertaken as an assessment task.

Computer Graphics Project (31248)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Construction Project Management Special Project 1 (16907)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Construction Project Management Special Project 2 (16908)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Construction Project Management Special Project 3 (16909)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Contaminated Site and Waste Remediation (49116)

There is an increasing need to identify, investigate and then remediate contaminated sites. Practitioners should be able to conceptualise these systems in order to predict contaminant distribution, fate and transport. This can be technically challenging due to complex biogeophysical interactions between waste, rocks, water and microbes along with uncertainties associated with defining these systems.
This subject provides students with an opportunity to undertake a detailed site investigation and modelling activity on a complex hypothetical contaminated site. This will enable them to gain experience in designing a soil/groundwater investigation and sampling program, along with predicting contaminant behaviour through descriptive and numerical modelling. An integral part of the subject is presenting these project outcomes in professionally relevant ways.

Contemporary Business Law (79708)

This subject provides students with an understanding of the legal system and a knowledge of a range of legal topics that are of practical relevance to business law. It provides timely information on recent developments in areas including commercial contracts and trade practices legislation, consumer protection, business structures and intellectual property.

Contemporary Indigenous Health and Wellbeing (92441)

Nurses have a major role to play in improving the Health of Indigenous Australians. To be effective however, nurses require both clinical skills and cultural respect. This subject focuses on improving students’ knowledge of Indigenous people in order to foster respect and understanding. Exploring their own attitudes, beliefs and understandings contributes to students being able to deliver evidence-based care in a culturally respectful way.
This subject emphasises exploring Indigenous perspectives of Australian history and the ongoing effects of colonisation for Indigenous people nationally and internationally; intergenerational loss and trauma; acknowledging Indigenous people as experts in their own Health; comprehending the social and cultural implications of engaging with the Health care system for Indigenous people; and fostering humility in safe, appreciative, collaborative spaces.

Contemporary Local Government Leadership (15618)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Corporate Accounting (22754)

This subject examines the institutional and legal framework of modern Australian financial accounting. The main topics include accounting for acquisition of assets including business enterprises; valuation and goodwill; consolidated accounts of complex economic entities; accounting for associate companies and joint ventures; and corporate restructuring.

Corporate and Financial Accounting (22009)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Corporate Finance (25765)

This subject exposes students to advanced corporate financial management by initially considering an economy with no risks and no market imperfections, and then relaxing these assumptions to consider a more realistic economic environment. Topics covered include capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure and valuation, dividend policy, and mergers and acquisition. Particular attention is paid to different tax environments and agency relationships within the firm.

Cost and Management Accounting (22008)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Cost Management and Analysis (22753)

The management and analysis of costs is fundamental to contemporary management accounting practices. Research shows that effective cost management and analysis practices can provide an organisation with a competitive advantage. This subject provides students with knowledge and skills for a broad range of important cost management and analysis practices. Much of this subject involves structured exercises using Excel spreadsheet modelling.
Topics include the budgeting and forecasting of costs and profits, the modelling and analysis of revenue, and cost behaviours for operational and strategic purposes, and the control of costs using standard and flexible variance analyses. Students are taught how to develop and use Excel spreadsheets. Spreadsheet exercises are embedded throughout the topics and classroom exercises. The subject presents a broad range of exercises based on practical, ‘real-life’ managerial situations, paying particular emphasis to building sustainable organisations.

Course Design and Assessment (010043)

This subject aims to develop university teachers’ ability to design courses and subjects that provide an environment for meaningful student learning in higher education. The subject looks at the context within which subjects and courses are developed and how course design policies shape the development of course goals and subject objectives. Participants in the subject develop an understanding of the principles of constructive alignment (Biggs, 2003) as a method for achieving consistency between objectives assessment, and teaching and learning activities. Participants relate the features of effective assessment to their own subject design, with attention to issues of equity, validity, the involvement of students in assessment choices, marking efficiencies, and the provision of effective feedback on student work. This subject enables university teachers to explore a range of methods for improving courses and subjects in order to ensure an effective learning environment for students.

Creative Practice and Methods (81512)

This subject focuses students on understanding how creative practices, processes and methods lead to innovation. Students create propositions in a collaborative environment, shape processes of discovery and exploration, generate solutions, develop visual literacy in dealing with complexity, and create frameworks for criticising and judging propositions. Built on values such as risk-taking and inquisitiveness, students’ research, analytical and creative practices are supported by their development of skills for effective communication of concepts and ideas. Students challenge their own ideas for building and running a creative practice through undertaking a central project for an external partner.

Culture: Plugged and Unplugged (54092)

This subject explores the historical meanings of ‘culture’, locating how the term has been used variously to refer to artistic production (e.g. sound culture, painting, dance); modes of communication (e.g. analogue, digital); the way of life of a people (e.g. Indigenous culture, everyday life); and forms of identity (e.g. street culture, queer, Goth). Students explore these diverse meanings and forms of culture, identifying how they position individuals, groups and communities. They will also look at the political and ethical consequences of these positionings, as well as how they articulate the values and beliefs of the society and individuals that produce and use them.
At the same time students create and explore their own cultural texts in order to understand how the meanings they experience as viewers or listeners are created in practice. These texts may take the form of writing, visuals, sound or movement, depending on the interests of individual students. In each case, the key concern is an exploration of how these texts articulate or respond to the social context in which they are produced.

Data Analytics for Entrepreneurs (25930)

This subject, partially delivered online, develops statistical knowledge and skills for entrepreneurs and innovators. The topics covered provide a basic understanding of statistical concepts to help entrepreneurs to better understand, analyse and interpret data. Students learn how to understand data using descriptive statistics, monitor processes using control charts and to explore relationships between variables using regression analysis. These statistical methodologies are useful for developing data driven start-ups that make evidence-based decisions.

Data Science Communication Project (36112)

The subject is an extension of Assessment Task 3 and provides specialist training for students wishing to develop their professional showcase and profile on top of their capstone project work. In this subject, students have the opportunity to form writing syndicates to support the exchange of ideas as they produce a publishable outcome that extends work completed as part of their iLab project. Students will develop writing and research skills and exchange ideas in a group environment, building on their iLab outputs to further define and enhance their data science leadership profile.

Deceptive Trade Practices (78123)

This subject examines deceptive trade practices law in Australia, including the meaning of trade and commerce, the meaning of misleading or deceptive conduct, and the remedies available where there has been misleading or deceptive conduct.

Deceptive Trade Practices (78181)

This subject examines in detail the statutory action of misleading and deceptive conduct within the meaning of section 18 of the Australian Consumer Law (ACL). Section 18 is contravened where a defendant engages in conduct that is likely to deceive in trade and commerce. Because the remedies under the ACL are more flexible, more far reaching and usually easier to establish than remedies available at common law or in equity, legal practitioners tend to rely on the statutory action of misleading and deceptive conduct as an alternative to traditional claims based on common law or equitable breaches of the general law.
In this subject, students analyse cases dealing with the meaning of the phrases ‘in trade and commerce’ and ‘misleading or deceptive conduct’ and how loss or damage is assessed. The application of the law to all the facts and circumstances is stressed. A distinction is drawn between cases involving competitors, rivals and political opponents and cases involving parties in contractual relationships such as vendors and their agents versus purchasers; finance providers and their agents versus borrowers; and, landlords and their agents versus tenants. Silence, promises, predictions and representations about future matters as misleading or deceptive conduct are also examined in depth.

Students examine the causal nexus between a contravention of section 18 of the ACL and any loss or damage suffered. Has the claimant relied on the misleading or deceptive conduct? Has the claimant’s reliance been a cause of his, her or its loss? What is the effect on a claimant who, although misled or deceived has failed to take reasonable care? Finally, the remedies available under the ACL are examined in detail.

Design in Asia (85800)

In recent times, there has been growing recognition of the role of design in fostering vibrant local economies and communities in Asia, and in the development of creative industries across the region. This subject introduces students to the highly disparate design cultures in Asia, and develops their knowledge of cross-cultural design practice in a collaborative and interdisciplinary setting. Focusing on design practices, issues and contexts in East and South-East Asia, the subject foregrounds national and regional traditions as well as the transnational networks and connections within which they are embedded.

Design Study Tour (88617)

This studio promotes cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural engagement within the discipline of interior and spatial design by constructing a studio environment in an international context. The studio aims to build upon students’ skills of investigation, documentation, analysis, and creative response by repositioning the studio in foreign geographic territory. The studio facilitates international cultural exchange by interacting with societies and stakeholders outside of the Australian context. It also promotes interdisciplinary activities through its engagement with external design programs.

Digital Sports Journalism (57205)

This subject equips students with the skills required for reporting, analysis and audience engagement in digital environments across sporting codes and institutions. Students examine the changing nature of sports journalism, the business of sport and rise of the ‘informed fan’ as a powerful force of both journalistic opportunity and media disruption.
Students work with experienced sports journalists and gain hands-on reporting experience via UTS’ unique partnership with the SCG Trust and other industry relationships. They examine how the nature of sports journalism is changing, and the intersection of sport, politics and the multiple ethical, legal and policy issues that arise in the area. Industry leaders, sports stars and other guest lecturers provide students with practical guidance and insights about building a career in sports journalism and related disciplines.

Directed Study 1 (31008)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 1 (32019)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Directed Study 2 (31009)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 2 (32020)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 3 (31010)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 3 (32021)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 4 (31013)

This subject is a small group subject that covers a specialist topic at an advanced level. The topic of an individual subject is chosen by the subject coordinator. There are no set lectures; instead, the students and the coordinator meet once a week to discuss the topic.

Directed Study 4 (32022)

This subject deals with issues involved in strategic level analysis and design in a corporate information systems environment. Through a major case study, it reinforces material previously studied, while giving groups of students scope to use their own judgement in applying their knowledge. It stresses the development and assessment of alternative approaches to a system strategy. Senior management and communication skills are also developed.

Directed Study A (60910)

This subject is designed to enhance development of students’ ability to undertake a professionally based scientific project. This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding supervision. Students contribute, in collaboration with their academic and, where relevant, industry supervisor, to the formulation of the project, including planning the work within an appropriate time scale. Students are responsible for appropriate analysis and critical evaluation of the data or information obtained and presentation of their findings in a formal written report. Students should approach potential supervisors in the first instance.
Before enrolment can be approved, the student and supervisor must provide the head of school with a short written project proposal, including assessment criteria and, where the project involves laboratory or field work, a completed risk assessment form. In addition, approval by the subject coordinator is required.

Directed Study B (60911)

This subject is designed to enhance development of a student’s ability to undertake a professionally based scientific project. This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding supervision. Students contribute, in collaboration with their academic supervisor and, where relevant, industry supervisor, to the formulation of the project, including planning the work within an appropriate time scale. Students are responsible for appropriate analysis and critical evaluation of the data or information obtained and presentation of their findings in a formal written report. Students should approach potential supervisors in the first instance.
Before enrolment can be approved, the student and supervisor must provide the head of school with a short written project proposal, including assessment criteria and, where the project involves laboratory or field work, a completed risk assessment form. In addition, approval by the subject coordinator is required.

Economics for Business (23115)

This subject provides students with a basic understanding of the economic influences on business. It offers an introductory treatment of consumer and business behaviour in competitive markets, the effects of government policies on market outcomes, and the basic economic concepts used in business analysis and decision-making. It also introduces students to the problem of aggregate economic fluctuations, inflation and the structure of economic relations between countries. Economics for Business also equips students with basic analytical skills to examine the impact of these macroeconomic forces on business conditions and to communicate the results of their analysis in writing.

Economics for Management (23706)

This subject comprises two parts which deal with the fundamental principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics as they relate to business management. The macroeconomics part of the subject is concerned with the larger-scale aspects of the economic systems in which businesses operate. It examines the determinants of gross domestic product, the behaviour of the general price level and inflation, unemployment, and the forces that affect the general rate of interest. Attention is also given to the nature, rationale and impact of government policies on the macroeconomic environment and business conditions.
The microeconomics part of the subject examines the forces of supply and demand, consumer behaviour, the nature of production costs, price-setting by firms in a range of market types, and the rationale for and fundamental forces affecting international trade.

Electronics and Circuits (48520)

The main objective of this subject is to familiarise students with basic electronic circuits, mainly with op-amps as active elements, and their applications. By the end of the subject, students should have acquired reasonable proficiency in the analysis of basic electronic circuits and be able to build and test circuits in the laboratory. Particular emphasis is placed on the practical, hands-on aspect of electronics to provide a solid working knowledge for basic analogue electronic circuits using op-amps.
Laboratory work is a significant proportion of in-class delivery so as to make students proficient in circuit construction, testing, troubleshooting and to give them a sound knowledge of the use of test instruments. Another objective is to show that practical electronic applications are relevant to other engineering and technical disciplines and may often be placed within a wider social or commercial context.

Engineering Experience 2 (48130)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Mechanics (48321)

This subject aims to assist students to acquire a fundamental understanding of static equilibrium concepts commonly used in analysis and design of engineered structures. It also aims to develop their skills in analysing simple structures such as statically determinate beams and trusses, subjected to various loading and support conditions.
On completion of this subject, students should be able to apply static equilibrium conditions as tools to analyse simple structures, and have developed an appreciation of design in civil engineering. The principles developed in this subject form the basis of structural analysis and design. This subject introduces students to the fundamental aspects that are a basis for subsequent fields of dynamics in civil engineering such as fluid mechanics, hydraulics and road design.

Engineering Practice in an Australian Context (42015)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Practice Preparation 1 (41035)

This early-stage undergraduate subject helps initiate students to the engineering workplace by guiding them through the employment process; developing the communication and documentation skills appropriate to engineering practice; showing them how to learn through experience; exploring the nature and culture of the workplace; introducing ethical and social issues; and helping them to plan for their own personal and professional development.
Students negotiate their learning options from a range of compulsory and optional topics including ethics and social responsibility; industrial relations; workplace, health and safety; and the culture of engineering. Tasks include preparing job application letters, employment interviewing, learning style assessment, an ethics case study and an industrial relations case study.

Assessment is essentially formative to assist students in achieving an acceptable level. However, students are not able to undertake the first engineering experience internship until they have passed all the compulsory components of this subject.

Engineering Practice Preparation 2 (41045)

This latter-stage undergraduate subject assists students to develop as professional engineers and supports preparation for the second stage of the Engineering Practice Program. Through participation in six workshops students develop and demonstrate their understanding of employment-related processes; ethical decision-making; social responsibility; opportunities for leadership and ‘followership’; and the complexities of workplace culture.
The workshops offer a range of collaborative and experiential learning activities in which students actively engage with their peers, reflect on their learning and refine their communication skills. Students review their past practice and consider their future development needs against the requirements of the Australian Engineering Competency Standards. Reflective practice is embedded throughout the subject to foster the development of students’ strategies for continued professional development and lifelong learning.

Engineering Practice Preview 2 (48141)

This latter-stage undergraduate subject assists students to develop as professional engineers and supports preparation for the second stage of the Engineering Practice Program. Through participation in six workshops students develop and demonstrate their understanding of employment-related processes; ethical decision-making; social responsibility; opportunities for leadership and ‘followership’; and the complexities of workplace culture.
The workshops offer a range of collaborative and experiential learning activities in which students actively engage with their peers, reflect on their learning and refine their communication skills appropriate for professional engineering practice. Students review their past practice and consider their future development needs against the requirements of the Australian Engineering Competency Standards. Reflective practice is embedded throughout the subject to foster the development of students’ strategies for continued professional development and lifelong learning.

Engineering Practice Reflection 1 (41038)

This subject guides students through a review of their first cycle of engineering practice and experiential learning outcomes; the latter arising in part from UTS-directed exploration of themes permeating professional practice. In group sessions, students reflect on individually-declared learning outcomes and evidence of their foundations in theory (formal study), practice (workplace experience) and personal choices. Specifically, students are urged to recognise experiential learning as a life-long imperative, to establish it as an enabling discipline while studying, and to claim its possibilities in all settings.
Students also reflect on common workplace challenges, and are assisted to develop professional responses. The diversity of workplace experiences reported by students is highlighted and respected. On a personal level, the subject requires students to demonstrate their developing appreciation of professional engineering competencies, under measures applied by Engineers Australia. Students reflect individually on their technical and professional progress, as a ‘learning journey’. This learning is documented for peer and professional review.

Since each student’s work experience is unique, all students benefit. Amid the inherent diversity of engineering internships, this subject enables all students to deepen their understanding of professional practice. Emphasis is placed on the diverse and changing nature of engineering workplaces; workplace cultures; employment opportunities and processes; ethics and social responsibility; communication and documentation; technology evolution and innovation; engineering methodology; occupational health and safety; and industrial relations. An emerging critique of practice, built partly on workplace learning, has to be demonstrated by all students.

Engineering Practice Reflection 2 (41048)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Practice Review 2 (48142)

Engineering Practice Review 2 helps students to develop as professional engineers by reflecting on their workplace practice and documenting their learning for peer and professional review. Since each student’s work experience is unique, all students benefit from sharing and discussing their experiences. However, this subject assists all students to appreciate the dimensions of professional engineering workplace practice, including: engineering in a global environment, organisational behaviour, commercial practice, industrial relations and human resource issues, ethics and social responsibility, communication and documentation, the extension and application of engineering knowledge, occupational health and safety, industrial relations, and personal and professional development and recognition.

Engineering Professional Experience 1 (41036)

This subject is essentially a ‘placeholder’ for students while they are working in industry or the community for the purpose of the first of their two engineering internships. Students are required to be enrolled in Work Integrated Learning 1 as a co-requisite to this subject.

Engineering Professional Experience 2 (41046)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Research Preparation (41029)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to learn and understand different methods that can be undertaken to successfully complete an engineering professional project or a graduate research project. In this subject students are expected to develop specialised knowledge and attributes that demonstrate their preparedness for further learning or high level professional practice while undertaking a project. Students are expected to use this knowledge to identify gaps and prepare a project proposal related to their field of study or major. Students then communicate their learning through written assignments and a final report encompassing a literature review and a preliminary project proposal.

Engineering Work Experience (41028)

This is a aero-credit-point subject that supports students while they are working in industry or the community for the purpose of gaining experience in the practice of engineering. Through engaging in practice-oriented education and regular reflection, students are provided with the opportunity to discover engineering workplace culture and to develop their basic technical and professional skills. Engineering educators, as well as engineering employers, have long recognised the value of integrating practical experience with academic studies.
Each student’s experience is unique. Employer or host organisations are not expected to provide formal training although some may choose to do so. Students are instead required to become active learners and seek opportunities to fulfil the objectives of this experience module. It is expected that students gain this level of experience early in their academic program. The professional engineering practice stream is based on a preparation subject, a work experience subject and a reflection subject. This is the work experience (middle) subject in the program. This subject involves students observing, practicing and reflecting on their development in basic technical and professional competencies.

Engineering Workplace Reflection (41055)

Successful engineers are able to communicate a professional identity to employers, clients, colleagues and other stakeholders in their work, as well as participate in constructive verbal and written professional communication. This subject provides students with opportunities to develop the ability to communicate their professional identity for the purposes of gaining employment and satisfying Engineers Australia’s requirement that all engineering graduates have a minimum of 12 weeks (or equivalent) professional practice.
Students are guided in the curation of a professional practice portfolio which demonstrates the learning outcomes of this subject and reflects on experience. A viva voce for students to defend the claims presented in their portfolio is also required.

Enhancing Local Government Service Delivery (15622)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Entrepreneurial Finance (25920)

This subject, partially delivered online, develops financial management knowledge and skills for entrepreneurs. The topics covered provide a basic understanding of key finance concepts and help plan and deliver financial management related aspects of early ventures and small businesses. Students learn the financial mathematics relevant for asset valuation and capital budgeting processes, as well as how financial and accounting information is used to support strategic decision making for early ventures and innovation initiatives.

Entrepreneurial Marketing and Sales (24910)

This subject, partially delivered online, develops marketing and sales knowledge and skills for entrepreneurs. The topics covered provide a basic understanding of concepts including customer behaviour and experiences, market analysis, segmentation, marketing strategy and planning as well as sales, networking and the role of social media. Students learn how, in early-stage enterprises, marketing and sales are used to develop markets, products and services.

Environment Research Project B (91546)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Environmental Communication (54094)

This subject explores the strategies through which citizens, corporations, public officials, journalists, artists, environmental groups and Indigenous people strive to influence public debate and shape important decisions that affect the future of the planet. While many environmental controversies hinge on scientific evidence, decisions about what to do turn on how that evidence is communicated, and on perceptions of science, technology and nature in the public sphere.
This subject focuses on climate change as a fundamental challenge in environmental communication. Students are introduced to key theories, concepts and practices in science communication, risk anticipation, environmental policy and environmental studies. They analyse how knowledge of existing and anticipated environmental hazard is communicated in public forums; the often unexamined cultural and ideological commitments embedded in talk about the environment; and the ways that ignorance and uncertainty (lack of knowledge, secrecy, disinformation) can be manipulated to shape public opinion and set policy agendas.

Students research and analyse case studies and/or develop their own environmental communication projects across a range of local and international environmental issues. Framing the different topics explored in this subject is the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’ which has become increasingly influential in both the human and natural sciences. This is the notion that we as a species have entered a new geological epoch in which – intentionally or otherwise – humankind is dramatically altering the geology, ecology, evolution and climate of the Earth.

Ethics in Finance (25602)

Ethical practices instil a public trust in the fairness of markets, allowing them to function efficiently. Additionally, ethical practices by finance and investment professionals benefit all market participants and stakeholders, and lead to increased investor confidence in global capital markets.
The perspectives acquired in this subject are useful to students in their place of work, as a framework for ethical conduct in the investment profession is presented by focusing on the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct. Citing examples of the scandals that have shaken public confidence in the ethics of Wall Street, this subject explains the importance of ethics in the operation of financial institutions and in the personal conduct of finance professionals.

Event Management (21640)

This subject deals with the festival and special event project management process. This process involves a series of sequential steps, specifically: initiation, planning, implementation, employment of control and monitoring systems, and evaluation and legacy management. In discussing these steps, those factors that act to condition how they are undertaken are addressed, including considerations linked to ethical and socially responsible business practice. The primary intent of this subject is to equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary to both plan and deliver events of various types and scale, and to critique current practice.

Evidence for Nursing (92440)

This subject develops skills in accessing and appraising the evidence upon which to base nursing practice. This subject builds on students’ understandings of the utility of published practice guidelines. Focus is on selection and appraisal of published primary research studies and applying the evidence to selected clinical situations. The subject focuses mainly on the appraisal of research using quantitative data analysis and the determination of indicators of clinical effectiveness. The appraisal of systematic reviews is also introduced. Popular Health claims are evaluated as a method of understanding how the indicators of clinical effectiveness are used.

Exchange Elective 1 (Education) (10140)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 1 (Information Technology) (90001)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 1 (Science) (99870)

This subject may be placed on a student’s program when going on exchange. For further details, contact UTS: Science.

Exchange Elective 2 (Education) (10141)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 2 (Information Technology) (90002)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 3 (Education) (10142)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 3 (Information Technology) (90003)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 4 (Education) (10143)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 4 (Information Technology) (90004)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 5 (Information Technology) (90005)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 6 (Information Technology) (90006)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 7 (Information Technology) (90007)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 8 (Information Technology) (90008)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective A (99850)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective B (99851)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective C (99852)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective D (99853)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective E (99854)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective F (99859)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective G (99860)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective H (99861)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Subject 1 (99863)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

Exchange Subject 2 (99864)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

Exchange Subject 3 (99865)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

Exchange Subject 4 (99866)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

Exchange Subject A (50720)

The UTS International Exchange program, administered by UTS: International Studies, offers students the option of completing part of their study in another country and receiving credit towards their degree at UTS. UTS: Communication participates in this program, under which students have the opportunity to undertake study at an exchange partner university.
Applicants for exchange must have their study at the exchange partner university approved by UTS: Communication’s international coordinator. The subject studied at the exchange partner university should have relevance to a student’s course of study, and be taught and assessed in an acceptable format.

Exchange Subject D (50723)

The UTS International Exchange program, administered by UTS: International Studies, offers students the option of completing part of their study in another country and receiving credit towards their degree at UTS. UTS: Communication participates in this program, under which students have the opportunity to undertake study at an exchange partner university.
Applicants for exchange must have their study at the exchange partner university approved by UTS: Communication’s international coordinator. The subject studied at the exchange partner university should have relevance to a student’s course of study, and be taught and assessed in an acceptable format.

Exhibition Design: Practice (88323)

This subject explores furniture design in a workshop setting. Students design and fabricate furniture with the aim of producing a full scale prototype of the design. Students are introduced to the design process in furniture, utilising analytical and intuitive thinking to solve design problems, employing both graphic means and three-dimensional models to express ideas. Further, students are introduced to the skills, attitudes and behaviours required in a shop setting for the fabrication of the project. Classroom lectures survey furniture design from the 1880s to the present, focusing on design histories, theories and technical matters. Students learn how to work with a variety of materials and manufacturing techniques in workshops that address the successful completion of their project.

Exhibition Design: Practice 1 (88323)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Family and Children’s Nursing (92439)

This subject contributes to students’ understanding of families in contemporary Australian society. Health promotion and primary Health care in a family context, and family formation and structure are highlighted. The subject explores nursing issues related to the child-bearing family including parenting, maintaining Health and wellbeing in children, families in crisis and the impact of disability on families. Key acute and chronic Health issues in children and adolescents together with recognition of the sick child are a major focus of this subject. Legal and ethical issues related to families such as child protection and guardianship are addressed in the context of children at risk. The subject enables students to develop the personal, professional and intellectual attributes, along with the technical knowledge, required to work with children and families in a broad range of settings.

Financial Reporting and Analysis (22748)

The principal aim of this subject is to provide students with the skills and competencies to undertake accounting analysis. Accounting analysis is a tool in performing business analysis using financial statements. In making accounting analyses, students distinguish between the information revealed by management on the firm’s underlying business activities, the sources and effects of distortions of this information that can be induced into the accounting numbers, and the errors that can arise in accounting estimates used in accounting numbers. This is an intermediate level financial accounting subject.

Financial Reporting Issues (22007)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Financial Statement Analysis (Capstone) (22319)

The aim of this subject is to demonstrate and apply a framework for business analysis and valuation using financial statement data. The emphasis of the course is on translating the tools of business analysis and valuation into practical situations. To achieve this, the subject is relatively case intensive, with this method used to develop key skills as well as demonstrating their application.
The subject is intended for students interested in business consulting, investment banking, business analysis and corporate lending. Given the increasing trend towards a business analysis-based approach to auditing and assurance services, it is also relevant to those interested in public accounting.

Forensic Biology Research Project B (91550)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Fundamentals of Business Finance (25300)

This subject develops an understanding of the technical and theoretical core concepts of finance and their applications to financial decision-making in the business environment which is required for professional practice. Topics include an overview of financial markets, time value of money, valuation of securities, risk and return, capital budgeting decisions, and financing decisions.

General Microbiology (91314)

Microbes are small but they have important relationships with the human world. Although some are involved in food spoilage and a minority are capable of causing disease in humans, animals and plants, many have numerous beneficial effects including maintaining health in our guts (i.e. the microbiome) and maintaining balance in the environment by recycling chemical elements such as carbon and nitrogen. Additionally, microbes have a number of important industrial applications in food and chemical production, bioremediation and sewage treatment. When considering their diverse roles, microbes are an exciting and important group of organisms to learn about.
This subject provides an introduction to the structure, function and taxonomy of the microbial world including bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Several key topics in the study of microbiology are discussed including microscopy, sterilisation, disinfection, microbial nutrition, microbial growth, bacterial identification schemes, as well as antibiotic and anti-microbial agents and contemporary techniques in molecular microbiology. Basic mycology, parasitology, and virology are covered, with an emphasis on transmission control of these organisms. The practical exercises give students experience in the principal laboratory procedures for the isolation, manipulation, growth and identification of microorganisms

Global Business Practice (26800)

This subject provides a collaborative and practical learning experience for students. The objective is for the participants to develop an in-depth understanding of international business and best practices. The subject focuses on providing students with an appreciation of the impact of global economics and finance on business models and strategies.
The subject integrates the essential analytical skills required for effective decision-making with the presentation skills necessary for successful implementation. Students are expected to work closely with a client, undertake primary research and analyse secondary data sources in order to design strategic business solutions. In addition to its focus on real-world applications of business knowledge and best practices, the subject positions the Executive MBA as a rigorous, forward-thinking and career-oriented program which sets high standards of scholarship.

Global Cinema (54081)

This subject focuses on key developments in global cinema with an emphasis on films that challenge students to think critically and creatively about the world in which they live. Through an engagement with films from a range of national and cultural contexts, students develop a critical vocabulary for thinking about the role that cinema can play in cultivating an ethically-minded mode of engagement via which the status quo is called into question. Drawing on recent debates in screen studies, students reflect on the role that innovations in film form can play in prompting audiences to consider how, and with what effects, the world could be transformed for the better.

Global Entrepreneurship (21945)

This subject encourages students to engage with and learn from technology leaders, key professionals and academics as well as major organisations and institutions in their area of interest. With the aim of understanding innovation trajectories and acquiring the depth of knowledge necessary to develop an entrepreneurial proposal, students also study relevant entrepreneurial and innovation practices and mindsets that have led to globally successful ventures.

Global Innovation Studio A (81517)

This Innovation Leadership program emphasises international networking and excursions or study tours in building a global perspective to group and individual engagement and practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another innovative, entrepreneurial and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive educational projects and experiences with students from overseas institutions, and utilising established international relationships.

Global Innovation Studio B (81518)

This Innovation Leadership program emphasises international networking and excursions or study tours in building a global perspective to group and individual engagement and practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another innovative, entrepreneurial and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive educational projects and experiences with students from overseas institutions, and utilising established international relationships.

Global Mobility A (41017)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to engage in short-term global programs such as Engineers Without Borders study tours, UTS Build: Aboard programs and other pre-approved international activities such as volunteer internships, practicum or entrepreneurship placements.

Global Mobility B (41018)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to engage in short-term global programs such as Engineers Without Borders study tours, UTS Build: Aboard programs and other pre-approved international activities such as volunteer internships, practicum or entrepreneurship placements.

Global Professional Experience Project (78295)

Internship subjects enable students to apply their academic learning to a professional context and in so doing, produce better equipped legal graduates. Internships undertaken overseas have the additional benefit of exposing students to legal practice in a global context. This subject provides students with an opportunity to gain international and practical legal experience so as to develop professional skills through ‘real-world’ legal work. The subject teaches students to reflect on their practical learning and its relationship to their academic education and legal skills. An internship is an invaluable workplace supplement to a student’s academic program and can help to enrich and enliven the classroom experience.
The international experience promotes crosscultural awareness, adaptability and resourcefulness and encourages students to think of themselves as future global professionals. This subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of self-management, critical reflection and professional responsibility through their participation in the internship and pre-departure preparations, their critical reflection and their debriefing presentation. The subject requires a placement with an international host organisation that can be arranged in two ways. Either, the Faculty provides placements over July (Spring session) or December/January/February (Summer session), ordinarily for four weeks.

Alternatively, students can apply to have a project they have organised independently approved by the Faculty. Students can view the available placements and the application form on the Faculty website. The website and application form explain what is required for application and how students are selected for placements or self-arranged internships.

Global Studio: Design Animation B (88822)

In this subject, students engage in an overseas study visit in order to gain a broader understanding of their chosen discipline. This subject offers an important insight into the global animation scene, and exposes students to a diverse series of approaches to animation. Students learn about different cultures, experience alternative attitudes towards the production and consumption of animation, and meet practitioners, educators and fellow students.

Global Studio: Fashion and Textiles A (88831)

The Fashion and Textile program emphasises international networking and visits/excursions/study tours in building a global perspective to an individual’s practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another design and educational culture, developing creative as well as personal maturity. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive fashion and textiles studios with students from overseas institutions. Through established relationships with international design schools, projects are undertaken with local students and practitioners.

Haematology 1 (91563)

This subject is designed to introduce the basic concepts of haematology and their practical application in a modern laboratory. The cells of the blood and bone marrow are studied in detail with regard to their identification, morphology and function. The development of these cells (haematopoesis) and their role in haemostasis and immune function is investigated. Students are also introduced to haematological diseases and the significance of haematological changes in disease. Students study modern laboratory analysers, and their functions and limitations, as well as how to interpret and troubleshoot issues from these automated machines.
The practical sessions introduce students to the variety of manual haematological techniques used in pathology and research laboratories. Students learn how to complete manual haematology tasks and interpret the results they obtain. To develop the skills needed to be a successful scientist in the field, the subject includes a strong focus of haematology morphology via the microscopy needed to make informed clinical interpretations which lead to accurate diagnosis of haematological disorders.

History and Theory of Intellectual Property (78238)

This subject covers selected topics in the history and theory of intellectual property. It gives students a background in the historical development of the areas of copyright, patents, trademarks and trade secrets law, as well as approaching important questions from jurisprudence, philosophy and legal theory in light of their application to intellectual property law.
Students engage in reading and discussion of key texts in the fields of property theory, law and economics and natural rights theory. Through selected case studies, students consider how the law has developed; the effects of social, cultural and political factors; as well as the application of legal theory to aspects of legal doctrine.

Students develop important skills in critical thinking and writing as part of these investigations and in formulating their own responses to questions such as: Is intellectual property really ‘property’? How long should intellectual property rights last? What is the relationship between intellectual property law and creativity or innovation? Is intellectual property infringement the same as ‘theft’ or ‘piracy’? The aim is for students to develop their theoretical and historical understanding of law by reference to the dynamic and contested field of intellectual property.

Human Anatomy and Physiology (91400)

In this subject students gain excellent basic knowledge in physiology, putting them in good stead for medical-oriented subjects in subsequent years and potential entrance into the medical and dentistry fields. Students learn the anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) of the healthy human body. Lectures are complemented by a supportive practical/tutorial program. The subject content includes: homeostasis; the anatomical organisation of the body and anatomical terms; and the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary systems. Development of practical skills is a major part of the subject.

Impossibilities to Possibilities (81539)

In this subject, participants engage in a creative series of practical activities that bring them to a broad understanding of creative intelligence and innovation as a field of practice. Through exploring what first seem to be impossibilities, they begin to investigate and reframe complex challenges, and experiment with new opportunities. Participants are challenged to analyse problem situations from multiple perspectives and to integrate these findings in ways that lead to new possibilities. Their first-hand experience in this subject of the nature of today’s open, complex, dynamic and networked problems inspires them to experiment and hone their skills in multidisciplinary team collaboration, visualisation, representation and presentation.

Industrial Design Special Project (84000)

Industrial design covers a diverse and complex range of issues dealing with the human condition and the built environment. Due to this diversity and complexity, practitioners generally specialise within a sector of the industry. This subject offers students the opportunity to gain a highly developed and detailed understanding of a specialised or specific area of industrial design practice. Entry into this subject is based on the capabilities of the individual student and the appropriateness of the proposed study.
Students engage with a specific project through a supervised self-directed learning contract that offers a flexible learning approach. Projects may respond to community and faculty needs or to the individual student’s preferred direction in their academic and career development. This subject may only be undertaken following consultation with, and approval by, the course director.

Industrial Water Pollution Control Engineering (42011)

Industrial wastewater treatment is of great importance for the protection of the environment in the context of the modern day world. Industrial wastewaters have often very different characteristics from domestic and municipal wastewaters which make it difficult to successfully treat in a sustainable way. The main objective of this subject is to provide the opportunity for students to understand the principles of industrial wastewater treatment, disposal and reuse in order to minimise pollution in a sustainable manner.
To get an in-depth understanding of the treatment and disposal of industrial wastewater, this subject commences with classification, characterisation and quantification of industrial wastes. The subject focuses on the principles and mechanisms of pollutant removal, the processes and design of conventional (primary, secondary and tertiary) and advanced (post-treatment) technologies applied in the treatment of industrial effluent. Various environmental management concepts relating to industrial pollution, prevention/pollution reduction at source, Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD), and cleaner production are covered. Special emphasis is given to water conservation and recycling since these allow more flexibility and have economic value as a water supply.

The subject includes various management practices of industrial waste, i.e. environmental auditing, trade waste policy, environmental rules and legislation and license agreements. Therefore, the subject brings both engineering and management together to prevent and reduce the pollution created by the industrial sector.

Initiatives and Entrepreneurship (81516)

This subject explores the traits and skills that are required to be ‘entrepreneurial’ in different professional contexts, ranging from tech- or social-start-ups, to intrapreneuring in public or private sector organisations, and academic, arts and/or science contexts. This subject takes students on an entrepreneurial journey, and results in high quality initiatives that provide value for different stakeholders (investors, customers and the broader community, etc.) while aligning with students’ personal drivers, talents and values.
The journey includes shaping initiatives, experimenting, and communicating potential value to different stakeholders in the ‘playing field’, in order to get feedback, and make decisions about whether to pivot, persevere or abandon entrepreneurial ideas. Furthermore, in this subject students reflect on the role and impact of entrepreneurial initiatives within the playing field and the broader social and economical systems, including considerations about ethics, idea ownership and impact.

Innovation by Design (21869)

This subject introduces students to contemporary theories of innovation and entrepreneurship. Central to business and corporate success in the contemporary ‘global high-tech’ economy is the need for innovation, risk-taking and entrepreneurial action. Entrepreneurship, including both the people and processes of organisational creation, is a fundamental dynamic of change in society.
Entrepreneurship is essential to the creation and renewal of economic wealth and well-being. Improvements in the internet, telecommunications and transport have contributed to enhancing entrepreneurial risk-taking. Innovation is the central driving force in tomorrow’s global economy. Innovation in every part of the firm’s systems, operations, culture and organisation is gaining greater importance. Process innovations, too, are increasing in importance. Managing and fostering these innovations continues to be a key managerial challenge.

Interdisciplinary Lab B (85302)

In this subject, design is conceived in its widest and most exciting sense; as an agent for change in a complex world. The aim is to connect students with live research projects led by experienced design researchers and often connected to industry or community partners. The subject presents assessments that require an interdisciplinary design approach and develop students’ skills in collaboration and teamwork. The emphasis is on experimentation and exploring new contexts for design practice.

International Construction (16074)

This subject aims to introduce students to construction industry structure, practices and methods of construction adopted in various parts of the world. The subject covers current practices and future trends in various countries, and international approaches to construction procurement, management practices and construction resource availability, requirement and usage. It also covers the impact of local economic, labour and technical parameters on construction management; staffing for international projects; and areas of competitive advantage in international construction.

International Criminal Law (78010)

The subject analyses international criminal law, with particular focus on conceptual and historical issues arising from prosecutions for international atrocities, the establishment of international criminal authority, and the legalisation of ‘justice’. The subject charts the origins of international criminal law from the post-war settlements of Versailles, and the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, to national-level prosecutions of international crimes and the establishment of international tribunals.
The subject examines international criminal law by assessing its purported objectives; its claims to provide redress, historical narrative (or memory) and deterrence, in light of its substantive achievements and failures, and its continued progress in the contemporary world. The subject examines the core crimes set out in the Rome Statute (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression), and analyses the function of the principal international institutions, the ad hoc tribunals, the International Criminal Court, and the ‘hybrid’ tribunals.

Additionally, the subject covers important foundational and doctrinal questions such as jurisdiction and immunities, extended modes of criminal responsibility and circumstances precluding liability. Students have the opportunity to explore in depth a number of areas of interest in the field, including torture, terrorism and corporate complicity in international crimes. Through the maintenance of an ongoing case file on a real-life situation currently before the International Criminal Court, as well as the presentation of submissions for a mock indictment before that court, students gain technical legal competence as well as a deep, practical understanding of the promise and pitfalls of the modern international criminal justice project.

International Criminal Law (78154)

The subject provides an overview of international criminal law, with particular focus on conceptual and historical issues arising from prosecutions for international atrocities, the establishment of international criminal authority, and the legalisation of ‘justice’. The subject charts the origins of international criminal law from the post-war settlements of Versailles, and the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, to national-level prosecutions of international crimes and the establishment of international tribunals.
The subject examines international criminal law by assessing its purported objectives: its claims to provide redress, historical narrative (or memory) and deterrence, in light of its substantive achievements and failures, and its continued progress in the contemporary world. The subject examines the core crimes set out in the Rome Statute (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression), and examines the function of the principal international institutions, the ad hoc tribunals, the International Criminal Court, and the ‘hybrid’ tribunals.

Additionally, the subject covers important foundational and doctrinal questions such as jurisdiction and immunities, extended modes of criminal responsibility and circumstances precluding liability. Finally, students have the opportunity to explore in depth a number of areas of interest in the field, including torture, terrorism and corporate complicity in international crimes.

International Exchange Subject 1 (99021)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

International Exchange Subject 2 (99022)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

International Exchange Subject 3 (99023)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

International Exchange Subject 4 (99024)

For further information, contact the Haymarket Student Centre.

International Legal Internship (76098)

Internship subjects enable students to apply their academic learning to a professional context and in so doing, produce better equipped legal graduates. Internships undertaken overseas have the additional benefit of exposing students to legal practice in a global context. This subject provides students with an opportunity to gain international and practical legal experience so as to develop professional skills through ‘real-world’ legal work. The subject teaches students to reflect on their practical learning and its relationship to their academic education and legal skills.
An internship is an invaluable workplace supplement to a student’s academic program and can help to enrich and enliven the classroom experience. The international experience promotes crosscultural awareness, adaptability and resourcefulness and encourages students to think of themselves as future global professionals.

This subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of self-management, critical reflection and professional responsibility through their participation in the internship as well as their pre-departure preparations, their critical reflection and their debriefing presentation. The subject requires a placement with an international host organisation that can be arranged in two ways. Either, the Faculty provides placements over July (Spring session) or December/January/February (Summer session), ordinarily for four weeks.

Alternatively, students can apply to have a project they have organised independently approved by the Faculty. Students can view the available placements and the application form on the Faculty website. The website and application form explain what is required to apply and how students are selected for placements or self-arranged internships.

International Management Field Study (21595)

This subject enables students to undertake a focused overseas study tour, during which the business, management and cultural practices of a selected country are researched and experienced. Through this, students gain first-hand exposure to the various business and international management theories that have been studied in their course.
The subject involves pre-departure briefings and lessons, as well as a mixture of in-country activities that may include visits to businesses, talks by business leaders and trade officials, tours of culturally significant venues, and/or time to explore freely. Feedback from previous students suggests that they have found the subject personally rewarding because, in the course of experiencing business, culture and travel in a foreign country, individuals discover capacities for leadership, collaborative support, and problem solving in themselves that might not emerge in a classroom.

This subject involves overseas travel and students taking this subject incur travel costs, which are in addition to the normal study fee. The faculty endeavours to keep travel costs as low as possible by negotiating group rates with airlines, hotels and other providers. To ensure the affordability of the study tour, it is only run if a sufficient number of students enrol and commit to the subject.

International Marketing (24220)

This subject focuses, in the first instance, on the issues relating to the ways in which firms consider the business opportunities for developing international marketing operations; and then secondly, on how those plans need to be evaluated, researched, developed and then implemented and managed.
Key topics include international market planning and evaluation; target market(s) research; evaluation of competitive advantage; positioning and strategy considerations; marketing plan development, implementation and management; as well as consideration of how such plans need to be integrated within the firm. All of this involves significant consideration of cultural, political, legal and other environmental factors that can facilitate or limit exchanges among, what can be, very diverse sellers and buyers.

Students learn different strategies that can be used in an international context to meet the different needs and wants of customers, while at the same time enabling international marketers to achieve their business goals and objectives. The emphasis in this subject is upon developing critical thinking in relation to international marketing opportunities and the use of marketing related tools to ‘solve’ those opportunities in a commercial environment.

International Organisations (78206)

The proliferation of intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations is one indicator of the internationalisation of social life and the interdependence of states in the early 21st century. This subject examines the principal legal issues concerning organisations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organisations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities and finally the organisations’ privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the subject addresses real-world problems such as: the creation of international criminal courts; the ‘succession’ of Russia to the USSR’s seat on the UN Security Council; the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia; the jurisdictional issues in the Lockerbie-case; the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council; the success of the WTO dispute settlement; NATO action against Serbia in 1999; the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11; and the UN administration of Kosovo and East Timor.

Primary consideration is given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal organisations such as ILO, the Bretton Woods institutions, WTO or ICAO, as well as regional ones such as the Council of Europe, the EU and others are also dealt with. This subject does not try to provide a comprehensive picture of all of these organisations, rather it aims to help students understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.

International Organisations (78207)

The proliferation of intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations is one indicator of the internationalisation of social life and the interdependence of states in the early 21st century. This subject examines the principal legal issues concerning organisations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organisations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities and finally the organisations’ privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the subject addresses real-world problems such as: the creation of international criminal courts; the ‘succession’ of Russia to the USSR’s seat on the UN Security Council; the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia; the jurisdictional issues in the Lockerbie-case; the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council; the success of the WTO dispute settlement; NATO action against Serbia in 1999; the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11; and the UN administration of Kosovo and East Timor.

Primary consideration is given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal organisations such as ILO, the Bretton Woods institutions, WTO or ICAO, as well as regional ones such as the Council of Europe, the EU and others are also dealt with. This subject does not try to provide a comprehensive picture of all of these organisations, rather it aims to help students understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.

Internetworking Project (31261)

This subject consolidates students’ understanding of internetworking-related theoretical knowledge and its application to practical projects which fall under two major categories: 1. Internetworking projects; and 2. Internetworking applications projects. This subject also provides students with the opportunity to work collaboratively in a team environment through project specification, design, set-up and implementation.

Introduction to Law (70110)

The subject is designed to provide students from a range of disciplines with a fundamental understanding of the Australian legal system and the areas of law particularly relevant to business. Its objective is for students to develop an understanding of the Australian legal framework and the role of law in regulating individual and commercial relationships and to provide a basis for undertaking further studies in law.
The subject is structured to cover 11 topics, comprising eight topics addressing learning about the Australian legal system and the civil, criminal and business relationships it regulates, and three topics covering international law. Topics 1-8 introduce students to the Australian legal system and help them understand the operation of Australian law. These topics aim to equip students with a foundational understanding of the operation of the Australian legal system to enable an effective transition into the more specialised learning involved with Topics 9-11. Topics 9-11 explore Australian law in an international context.

Introduction to Photography (88805)

This subject covers the basic principles of camera functions and digital photography. Students explore the design elements of images, creative and innovative approaches to conceiving photographs, and ways of developing visual awareness. Digital cameras are used to document the world, build a visual archive and communicate observations and ideas.

Introduction to Photography for Design and Architecture (88801)

This subject covers the basic principles of camera functions and digital photography. Students explore the design elements of images, creative and innovative approaches to conceiving photographs, and ways of developing visual awareness. Digital cameras are used to document the world, build a visual archive and communicate observations and ideas.

Introduction to Statistics (31751)

This subject focuses on data analysis. Students learn how to collect and analyse data, and how to draw valid conclusions from the data. The subject begins with a discussion of how to sample from a population and how to describe the data collected. This is followed by a discussion of how to form and test hypotheses about the population using the data collected from the sample.

Introduction to Taxation Law (77938)

This subject acquaints students with Australian taxation law in a practical business environment. The focus of the syllabus is on the application of tax law concepts in a professional accounting setting. It aims to develop students’ conceptual and analytical skills and give them an appreciation of the Australian tax system. It provides a general analysis of the current tax system and consideration of the many changes it is presently undergoing with an emphasis on the implications for the commercial world.
The subject looks at the Income Tax Assessment Act, the Tax Law Reform Project and the New Tax System. Particular concepts to be considered include: taxable income, income, deductions, capital gains tax, trusts, partnerships, companies and shareholders, tax accounting, tax planning and anti-avoidance provisions, fringe benefits tax, and goods and services tax.

Investment Analysis (25503)

This subject introduces the conceptual and theoretical framework of the portfolio approach to investments. It applies the techniques of mean-variance diversification to portfolio construction and the investment management process. Asset pricing models and their application to investment management are also reviewed. Other topics covered include bond portfolio management, active and passive investment strategies and the measurement of investment performance.

IT Experience 1 (31137)

This subject involves formal planning and reflection, with students keeping track of their industry experiences. This is a zero-credit-point subject that supports students while they are working in industry for the purpose of gaining work experience.

IT Experience 2 (31139)

This subject involves formal planning and reflection, with students keeping track of their industry experiences. It is a zero-credit-point subject that supports students while they are working in industry for the purpose of gaining work experience.

Jessup International Moot (76039)

This elective encourages participation in the Jessup International Moot. The moot is organised by the Association of Student International Law Societies, which operates under the auspices of the American Society of International Law in Washington. The workload involved is particularly demanding: the problems circulated are on complex and current issues of international law. Detailed research into both international and comparative law is essential to prepare complex pleadings for both sides with a maximum size prescribed. The work involved is certainly no less than that for a large research project. The memorials are assessed by memorial judges, often including distinguished teachers of international law.
In addition, there is the opportunity to present oral submissions in the four preliminary rounds. The top eight teams move on to the final rounds. Because of the rules of the Jessup Moot, no assessment is available until after the conclusion of the Australian finals of the Jessup Moot each year.

Law and Literature (76902)

In this subject, students examine literary and legal responses to violence and trauma. The purpose of this examination is for students to understand and apply complex concepts that are drawn from the interdisciplinary areas of law and the humanities.
Students engage in a rigorous process of reading and discussion that includes some of the most fascinating and thought provoking literary works of the present, and of the 20th century, as well as judgments and other legal documents. Using these texts, students think about questions of justice related to central problems and traumas of recent times: the Holocaust, family violence, slavery and the Stolen Generations. Students use their readings of legal and literary texts to respond to questions about the role of law in adjudicating suffering and violence.

Students apply advanced critical skills of analysis, research, communication and critical thinking; learning to not only evaluate and synthesise information, but also to critique legal and academic arguments. Students develop their capacity to communicate understanding of the concepts and critiques of the materials by presenting their ideas in lectures and seminars and providing peer feedback in weekly online activities.

Legal and Professional Skills (75424)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the competency standards set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer. It is complemented by the other three Practical Legal Training (PLT) subjects: Transactional Practice, Litigation and Estate Practice and Practical Experience.
The practice of law requires an understanding of the legislative and regulatory environment in which the legal profession operates. The integration of practical and theoretical approaches to legal ethics and legal practice provides a basis from which students can better integrate ethical priorities within their own moral compass, and develop personal priorities around resilience.

Students apply their legal skills and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of legal practitioners, including obligations relating to a solicitor’s trust account. Participation in drafting, interviewing and negotiation workshops and in online discussions enables students to practise essential skills in a client focused environment. The weekly activities also provide practical scenarios in which students can better understand how conduct rules apply in a professional context and the operation and application of trust accounting procedures. Students also develop and reflect on the targeted graduate attributes including the application of resilience strategies for personal benefit and in the workplace environment.

Litigation and Estate Practice (75423)

This subject encourages students to experience and reflect on the targeted graduate attributes developed by the faculty. The subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015.
The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.

This subject is one of four subjects that constitute the Practical Legal Training (PLT) program. It is complemented by the three other PLT subjects: Legal and Professional Skills, Transactional Practice and Practical Experience. The subject has three components: civil litigation wills and estate practice, and family law practice or criminal law practice.

Management Planning and Control (22705)

This subject examines the role of management accounting in the process of planning, control, and performance evaluation of contemporary organisations at corporate, division and functional levels. It discusses what it means to have an organisation be in control, what alternatives managers have for ensuring good control, and how managers should choose from among control system alternatives.

Marketing Foundations (24108)

This subject covers the basic principles of marketing. It develops an understanding of the overall process of marketing planning, implementation and control in the contemporary business environment. It also develops a basic understanding of marketing information systems; market research and marketing ethics; market segmentation; buyer behaviour; product development; and the development of product, distribution, promotion and pricing strategies for both goods and services domestically and internationally. The aforementioned principles of marketing are demonstrated using situations that students will encounter in their professional practice of marketing.

Mathematical Modelling 2 (33230)

This subject consists of two parts: multivariate calculus and an introduction to statistics. The mathematical part develops the skills required for the mathematical modelling of systems involving more than one independent variable. The statistics part is an introduction to descriptive statistics, statistical inference and simple linear regression.
Topics include linear algebra, solutions to sets of equations resulting from particular problems, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, partial derivatives, optimisation, multiple integrals and their applications, and probability with a focus on the determination of the reliability of a system of components in various engineering contexts.

Mathematical Modelling for Science (33190)

Mathematical modelling is essential in all branches of science. This subject develops the knowledge and skills necessary for problem-solving and mathematical modelling at an introductory level. Topics covered include: vectors and geometry; complex numbers; calculus and its relationship to science; differentiation and integration of functions; inverse, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions; the solution of differential equations with applications to exponential growth and decay and oscillating systems; Taylor series; and an introduction to linear algebra. The computer algebra system Mathematica is used for symbolic, graphical and numerical computations.

Media Arts Project (54035)

This is the capstone project for the Media Arts and Production major. Students develop and complete a small media arts project, e.g. sound, moving image, interactive, installation or performance. They can consider a range of distribution modes for the project such as online, broadcast, theatrical or other hybrid models. Students may undertake this subject in a variety of ways. They can produce a short media work in either sound, video, interactive media, installation, performance or film with encouragement to explore the possibilities of convergent media. They can form small collaborative associations and work as a team to produce a work of greater scope or complexity. Or, they can develop their skills in a specific production area or crew role and undertake this role on several projects across the session.

Media Arts Project Capstone (57180)

In this subject, students complete an individual original short project (in film, video, television, online, sound, radio, performance and installation or multi-platform) via taking significant creative crew roles on a number of projects agreed by your lecturer by working in groups of two or three to make one original short project. The completed project should demonstrate the student’s advanced professional skills and creative expertise.
The project must be successfully completed during the session, although it may have been developed and commenced during the Research and Development subject or equivalent Scriptwriting subject. It must be feasible to be produced within the resources available both through UTS and those provided by the student from outside UTS. The proposed project must be approved by your lecturer. Students are required to submit critical documentation (approximately 3000 words) of their research, production development and production process to accompany the final project. This documentation should demonstrate the student’s critical relationship to their media production practice.

This subject differs from the Research and Development subject in that it is expected that the completed project work is conceptually and creatively challenging. The production and/or post-production process should be considerably more demanding and the resulting project should show evidence of the student as a media arts program maker. The subject is conducted by class and individual supervision by your lecturer.

Media Power (54080)

Media power shapes individual and social environments from womb to tomb and beyond, raising questions about who controls our media lives: corporations or citizens? Governments or revolutionaries? Working in teams, students use classic and cutting-edge media studies concepts to debate current media controversies such as privacy, trolling, cyberdating, manipulation, activism, ownership, avatars, diversity, and digital addictions to TV series, social media and games. Students will acquire new skills in critical appraisal, research design, analysis and research reporting. They will also develop powerful research questions, and design and conduct original and ethical research projects.
In this subject, students will investigate key aspects of media audiences, producers, communities, media practice and power structures; and build their research capacity for future media research careers, honours studies and beyond. Practical research skills are combined with communication practice in this media studies subject investigating media power.

Metabolic Biochemistry (91320)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Modern American Architecture (11195)

Through fieldwork, and photographic and drawn analysis, students consider the relationship between the diverse practices of architecture and American modernity. They also question the relevance of theories of modernity on contemporary architectural practices. The subject develops students’ ability to understand architecture as built form through experiencing key case studies from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in North America. Themes considered may include influences from Europe; technologies influencing new design attitudes; the importance of the domestic dwelling unit and single houses in modern considerations of spatial division; the impact of print media and exhibition on architectural attitudes; and the link between architecture and contemporary art practices.

Molecular Biology 1 (91132)

This subject provides an introduction to the basics of molecular biology and an understanding of the key concepts underlying the experimental techniques of DNA manipulations in a molecular biology laboratory. The key techniques and the science behind the methodology are introduced, which enables the student to embrace a wide learning curve of elements within the subject. The student is encouraged and challenged to understand ideas and concepts, evaluate and analyse data and information, and apply these skills to creating their own molecular biology material in the assignment tasks.
Topics covered include: DNA and RNA isolation, restriction enzymes, DNA ligation, cloning strategies; southern, northern and western blotting; and an introduction to DNA sequencing and PCR. Emphasis is also placed on the use of databases to retrieve and analyse nucleic acid and protein sequences. This subject encourages students to become adept at the techniques required for molecular analysis in a modern scientific laboratory, and provides a foundation for more advanced molecular biology study, as well as the skills and knowledge for future potential positions in industry, such as pharmaceutical and commercial, research and development, and gene technology and engineering companies.

Moot (76900)

UTS: Law offers students the opportunity to participate in a variety of mooting competitions, both within Australia and overseas. Students enrol in this subject in cases where participation in a mooting team is counted as credit towards their degree. UTS: Law calls for expressions of interest from students to participate in a variety of moot competitions.

Numeracy for Lifelong and Lifewide Learning (028289)

This subject is designed for education students to examine and develop their own approaches to learning numeracy for professional, academic and personal purposes. Numeracy is sometimes understood as basic mathematical skills, however, the subject takes a broader sociocultural perspective that views numeracy as what people do with mathematical ideas, methods and skills in a wide range of activities. Such a perspective acknowledges that there are multiple numeracies, because numeracy in practice is influenced by its particular social, cultural and historical context. This perspective also recognises that people develop numeracy in different ways, bringing different histories and purposes into developing their numeracy.
In this subject, students investigate how numeracy practices are constituted socioculturally; mediated through language, mathematics and other symbolic and material tools; and imbued with power relations. Students design and carry out a numeracy investigation around an issue or topic of their choice.

Numerical Analysis for Quantitative Finance (25852)

This subject presents various numerical methods used in quantitative finance. It provides a rigorous understanding of advanced numerical, statistical and filtering methods. Emphasis is on simulation methods for solving stochastic differential equations, their systematic application and their links to finite difference and other numerical methods.

Numerical Methods in Finance (25874)

The subject covers the theoretical and practical aspects of numerical methods for pricing and hedging options. There is a strong emphasis on programming, with students learning how to implement the various techniques themselves.

Numerical Methods of Finance (35366)

This subject presents various numerical methods used in quantitative finance. It provides a rigorous understanding of advanced numerical, statistical and filtering methods. Emphasis is on simulation methods for solving stochastic differential equations, their systematic application and their links to finite difference and other numerical methods.

Nursing Care of the Older Person (92437)

In this subject, students explore the foundational principles and practice of person-centred nursing care of the older person in a variety of Health care contexts. Students explore the normal ageing process and the diseases and dysfunctions that can occur in older age. The provision of quality care to the older person with multiple physical, social and psychological co-morbidities is emphasised. Students gain skills in undertaking comprehensive Health assessments of older persons and gain an understanding of interprofessional approaches to care. Students continue to develop nursing skills specifically in relation to wound care, continence and bowel management, enteral supports, and end-of-life care. Through the provision of interactive online modules, collaborative laboratory activities and lectures provided by industry experts, this subject encourages students to engage with this important area of Health care.

Optimisation in Quantitative Management (37242)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Organic Chemistry 1 (65202)

This subject introduces students to the reactions characteristic of the common families of carbon compounds and explores the details and implications of the reaction mechanisms involved. A primary objective is for students to gain an appreciation of the relationship of molecular structure to reactivity across a broad range of functional groups.
Students have the opportunity to perform many of these reactions in the laboratory, and to evaluate the success of their experiments by analysis of their reaction products using gas chromatography and infra-red spectroscopy as well as mp, bp and refractive index measurements critically. These are skills required for professional chemists.

Patent Law (77898)

This subject provides an understanding of the principles of patents and the patent system in Australia. Patents have been the subject of much controversy in recent times: biotechnology challenges our traditional distinction between nature and invention; the health demands of developing countries come into conflict with the private interests of patent owners; the use of traditional knowledge of Indigenous communities in biodiscovery processes can complicate the availability of patent protection; the computer software industry demands patent protection to supplement their rights in copyright; and in a growing number of cases patents can be granted for ‘business methods’.
In this subject, students are introduced to the law of patents: what is patentable subject matter; what are the threshold requirements of patentability; what level of disclosure is required to justify the grant of the patentee’s monopoly rights (section 40 of the federal Patents Act 1990); the rights of the patent holder; exploitation of patent rights; and actions for infringement. In addition, special issues relating to biotechnology patents and the international context in which Australia’s patent law operates are considered. There is some attention to plant breeders’ rights and the law relating to breach of confidence.

Students develop legal knowledge and analytical skills through problem-solving activities that mirror the legal and factual issues that arise in legal and business practice. These activities provide opportunities for students to develop commercial skills and become solution-focused practitioners. The subject builds students’ skills of critical analysis and oral communication through discussion of different theoretical, jurisprudential and policy issues underlying areas of patent law. Students also undertake research that enables them to critically evaluate laws, practices and policies. The subject combines a practical with a theoretical approach, enriching students’ understanding of the complex public and private interests at play, and preparing them for careers in professional practice or general commerce.

Patent Law (78190)

This subject provides an understanding of the principles of patents and the patent system in Australia. Topics covered include subject matter, section 40 of the Patents Act 1990 (specifications), infringement, inventorship, ownership and breach of confidence.
Patents have been the subject of much controversy in recent times. Biotechnology challenges our traditional distinction between nature and invention; the health demands of developing countries come into conflict with the private interest of patent owners; the use of traditional knowledge of indigenous communities in biodiscovery processes can complicate the availability of patent protection; US pharmaceutical companies demand a greater role in determining what drugs should be available under Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme; the computer software industry demands patent protection to supplement their rights in copyright; and in a growing number of cases patents can be granted for ‘business methods’.

In this subject, students are introduced to the law of patents – what is patentable subject matter, what are the threshold requirements of patentability, what level of disclosure is required to justify the grant of the patentee’s monopoly rights, the rights of the patent holder, exploitation of patent rights, and actions for infringement. In addition, special issues relating to biotechnology patents and the international context in which Australia’s patent law operates are considered. There is some attention to plant varieties rights and the use of the action for breach of confidence to protect trade secrets.

Pharmacology 1 (91707)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Photography in Architecture (11318)

This subject introduces students to photography’s historic, aesthetic, technical and contemporary role in architecture. Through lectures, workshops and practical assignments, the fundamental principles of photography are addressed, practiced and appreciated. This provides a sound framework to begin investigating architectural photography techniques and methodology, and its function in the practice of architecture. Key objectives include: reinforcing fundamental photographic principles such as composition, light, movement and form; developing sound methodological practice; experiencing the vagaries of location conditions and how to manage them; pre- and post-production considerations; and appreciating the historic and contemporary relevance of photography.
The subject provides a balance between lecture-based learning, studio workshops, tutorial critiques, practical demonstrations and location assignments. It aims to fine-tune photographic composition and technique, while developing an understanding and appreciation for architectural photography and its role in the practice of design.

Physics in Action (68201)

This subject is a foundation for later-stage subjects. In this subject students learn about: electrostatics, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and induction, geometrical optics, physical optics, introductory atomic physics, and quantum theory. Research linked to each of the topic areas, and which is happening within the School of Mathematics and Physical Sciences at UTS, is integrated into this subject.

Practical Experience (75411)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.
This subject is one of four subjects that constitute the Practical Legal Training (PLT) program. It is a work-integrated subject complemented by the three other PLT subjects: Legal and Professional Skills, Transactional Practice, and Litigation and Estate Practice. This subject enables students to bring together the knowledge of legal practice gained in the complementary PLT subjects and apply their learning in a legal workplace. Students undertake a minimum of 15 weeks of full-time or equivalent part-time work experience in a legal office environment.

This is a zero-credit-point subject that is graded pass/fail. Grading is based on supervisors’ reports as to the competency of students’ practice in their workplaces. To be competent, students must achieve the standard of an entry-level lawyer. Students may enrol in this subject when they enrol in Legal and Professional Skills. Practical Experience placements must be approved in advance by the UTS Faculty of Law Practical Experience Committee and completed in accordance with the Practical Experience Rules. Students must complete their practical experience work placement within two years of enrolling in this subject.

Preparation for and Review of IT Experience (31136)

This subject involves formal planning of and regular reporting on work experience undertaken in 31137 IT Experience 1. There is particular emphasis on the skills students hope to gain.

Preparing for Intellectual Property Practice (77905)

This subject introduces students to the: legal systems and intellectual property laws of Australia and New Zealand, professional responsibility for patent and trade marks attorneys; and the commercialisation of intellectual property. Students use this knowledge as a framework to develop skills in critical analysis, critical evaluation and legal writing for intellectual property practice.
The subject is in three parts. Each part has a dedicated online forum where students are invited to discuss and ask any questions that arise as they explore the materials, build skills and test their learning.

Part 1 explores the Australian and New Zealand legal systems, the courts and legislative processes, and the protection of intellectual property rights by local and international legal systems. Students start to apply the skills of statutory interpretation, case analysis and legal writing, and have opportunities to test their learning and obtain feedback on developing skills.

Part 2 explores the rights, privileges and responsibilities of practising patent or trade mark attorneys towards their clients, the profession and the community. Further opportunities are offered for students to test their knowledge and incorporate feedback to further develop their skills.

Part 3 explores the principles involved in the efficient and effective management, commercialisation and exploitation of intellectual property assets together with the legal entities and processes used in licensing, franchising, assignment and securing intellectual property rights.

Students refine their analytical skills and legal writing and receive feedback on their progress. Students use the knowledge and skills gained in this subject in intellectual property and/or law subjects as well as in practice.

Privacy and Surveillance Law (76089)

Issues surrounding privacy and surveillance are attracting increasing attention in contemporary public debate, fuelled, in no small way, by the emergence of new technologies. They are multi-faceted, controversial and challenging. This subject explores key legal and policy questions relating to invasion of personal privacy, data protection and retention, and surveillance of personal conversations, activities and location.
It also tackles emerging issues and challenges prompted, in particular, by the advent of new technologies, including online privacy protection, anonymity/pseudonymity and the right to be forgotten. This necessitates travelling through disrupted legal terrain, formed by a complex mix of common law and statute, federal as well as state/territory laws. It also requires students to engage with a range of perspectives, ideas and interests.

Understanding of key issues is further deepened by interrogating the wider contexts in which privacy and surveillance law operates and is informed, including theoretical, constitutional, policy and international settings. Students are also asked to critically evaluate a range of responses to privacy and surveillance issues including law reform proposals.

Privacy and Surveillance: Law and Policy (78248)

Privacy and surveillance regulation features prominently in contemporary public debate in Australia. It is controversial, dynamic and challenging. This subject explores key legal and policy issues arising in this space. Specifically, it investigates various dimensions of privacy including invasion of personal privacy, data protection and retention, and surveillance of personal conversations, activities and locations.
It also tackles emerging issues and challenges prompted by the advent of new technologies, including online privacy protection, anonymity/pseudonymity and the right to be forgotten. This necessitates travelling through disrupted legal terrain, formed by a complex mix of common law and statute as well as federal and state/territory laws. It also calls for students to engage with a range of relevant perspectives, views and interests.

Understanding of key issues is further deepened by interrogating the wider contexts in which privacy and surveillance law and policy operate and are informed, including theoretical, constitutional, ethical and international contexts. The subject also exposes students to a myriad of ethical dilemmas associated with privacy and surveillance, and enhances their capacity to develop strategies to address such issues.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 1 (91552)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to gain real-world work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. The subject provides approved professional experience in a (bio)medical science service provider laboratory in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
The focus is on the attributes required for a successful job application; orientation to workplace practices; self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs; effective written and oral communication skills; application and extension of knowledge; technology proficiency; and early workplace experiences. The subject aims to introduce students to the major specialties in a pathology or research laboratory, e.g. immunology, microbiology and biochemistry. Students may have the opportunity to rotate through these specialty laboratories or they may be allocated to one specialty for the entire placement. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 2 (91553)

This subject is the second in a series that provides students with the opportunity to gain ‘real-world’ work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. This subject provides approved professional experience within a (bio)medical science service provider, in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
It focuses on the skills and attributes required in a successful application for a job, workplace practices, self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs, effective written and oral communication skills, application and extension of knowledge, and technology proficiency. This subject aims to provide students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge and experience gained through their previous placement and their university studies, in order to further develop as professional scientists. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 3 (91554)

This subject is the third in a series that provides students with the opportunity to gain ‘real-world’ work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. This subject provides approved professional experience within a (bio)medical science service provider, in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
It focuses on the skills and attributes required in a successful application for a job, workplace practices, self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs, effective written and oral communication skills, application and extension of knowledge, and technology proficiency. This subject aims to provide students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge and experience gained through their previous professional placements and their university studies, in order to further develop as professional scientists. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science PT A (91557)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to gain real-world work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. The subject provides approved professional experience in a biomedical science service provider laboratory in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
The focus is on the attributes required for a successful job application; orientation to workplace practices; self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs; effective written and oral communication skills; application and extension of knowledge; technology proficiency; and early workplace experiences. The principal aim of the subject is to provide students with experience-based exposure to the industry of biomedical science, to help students develop as professional scientists. Students learn from their own experiences in a professional setting through reflection on their workplace practices and documentation of their learning. They have the opportunity to devise strategies to fuse their practical experiences with future endeavours, and gain deeper awareness of themselves and their abilities to plan for professional and personal development, providing a competitive advantage for future employment.

The subject may be taken as the first in professional experience or after successful completion of Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 1. Specifics of the placement may differ depending on the sequence of subjects. The student may experience an introduction to several specialities in a pathology laboratory, e.g. microbiology, histology and biochemistry; or the student may focus on one laboratory specialty for the duration of the placement. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science PT B (91558)

For subject description, contact the Faculty of Science.

Professional Internship (54091)

Students develop a structured industry experience project in the area of their major study. This involves the negotiation of a learning contract to identify the outcomes of such experience and to design a detailed program of activities to achieve these outcomes. Supervision is provided to assist students in identifying the capabilities they need to develop and to provide support and advice during their industry involvement. Students are assisted to reflect on their workplace learning experience in the context of their chosen field of study.

Professional Practice (BE) (48100)

Successful professional engineers are able to communicate a professional identity to employers, clients, colleagues and other stakeholders in their work, and participate in constructive verbal and written professional communication. This subject provides students with opportunities to develop their ability to communicate their professional identity for the purpose of gaining employment and satisfying Engineers Australia’s requirement that all engineering graduates have a minimum of 12 weeks (or equivalent) of professional practice.
Students are guided in the curation of a professional practice portfolio that demonstrates the learning outcomes of this subject and reflects on experience. A viva voce for students to defend the claims presented in their portfolios is also required.

Professional Science Project (60909)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulate the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This report must include an introduction to the project, a description of the methods used, a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. Students may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Project (31028)

This subject is intended to give students experience in working independently on a small research or development project. The project may be drawn from any area of information technology or may be part of a multidisciplinary project such as those managed by UTS Shopfront. Students can work on a project individually or in a small group. Each project is supervised by a member of academic staff.

Project (31029)

This subject is intended to give students experience in working independently on a small research or development project. The project may be drawn from any area of information technology or may be part of a multidisciplinary project such as those managed by UTS Shopfront. Students can work on a project individually or in a small group. Each project is supervised by a member of academic staff.

Project (31030)

This subject is intended to give students experience in working independently on a small research or development project. The project may be drawn from any area of information technology or may be part of a multidisciplinary project such as those managed by UTS Shopfront. Students can work on a project individually or in a small group. Each project is supervised by a member of academic staff.

Quantitative Business Analysis (25622)

The subject provides students with essential knowledge and skills required by downstream subjects in the Bachelor of Business. Students consolidate their mathematical and statistical knowledge, and apply it to financial problems. The subject focuses on developing practical modelling skills sought by financial industry professionals.

Quantitative Portfolio Analysis (25876)

Designed specifically for quantitative finance students, this subject provides a rigorous understanding of portfolio management using quantitative tools. The subject presents advanced techniques and applications in quantitative investment including portfolio construction, portfolio implementation, factor models and performance measurement.
The subject also considers implementation issues on portfolio construction, backtesting and statistical estimation. The subject combines rigorous treatment of the theoretical concepts with extensive practical problems in quantitative portfolio analysis.

Reflective Academic Practice (010045)

This subject enables participants to extend their awareness of the broader context of academic work in a practice-oriented university. Participants have the choice of exploring a wide range of topics relevant to their academic work, including research supervision or research-led teaching in their discipline. Credit can be gained towards subject completion by participating in professional development activities offered in the University, such as the LEAP modules on entrepreneurship or project management. The subject also provides an opportunity for participants to reflect on their learning over the course as a whole and identify practical learning outcomes for their own practice.

Regression Analysis (37252)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Review of IT Experience (31138)

This subject involves formal planning of and regular reporting on work experience undertaken in 31139 IT Experience 1. There is particular emphasis on the skills students hope to gain.

Scholarly Teaching and Learning Project (010044)

This subject draws together and builds on what participants have learned in other course subjects and their previous teaching experience. It involves participants undertaking a scholarly project focused on understanding and improving selected aspects of their teaching and learning. Participants choose an area they would like to investigate, and undertake one plan-act-observe-reflect cycle. This means they will plan a change to their teaching or subject, implement the change, collect information about its effects, and reflect on the information. The project is informed by scholarly literature related to higher education in general and/or to teaching and learning in the participant’s discipline. Participants may choose to develop their project further and communicate it to achieve publishable outcomes.

Science Internship (18cp) (60707)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 300 hours of work. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship (24cp) (60709)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 400 hours of work. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship A (12cp) (60703)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 200 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship A (6cp) (60702)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship B (12cp) (60705)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study. Students must undertake approximately 200 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship B (6cp) (60704)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute), or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks, which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences are applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship C (6cp) (60706)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship D (6cp) (60708)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Social Planning and Community Development (15602)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Special Course A (6cp) (49086)

This subject offers students maximum educational opportunity to benefit from short courses and other learning experiences available through the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. Enrolment for credit is approved by the director, teaching and learning. Approval requires demonstration by the candidate to the director of a special learning need or development opportunity consistent with the other requirements of the candidate’s program.

Special Course B (6cp) (49096)

This subject offers students maximum educational opportunity to benefit from short courses and other learning experiences available through the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. Enrolment for credit is approved by the director, teaching and learning. Approval requires demonstration by the candidate to the director of a special learning need or development opportunity consistent with the other requirements of the candidate’s program.

Special Project (Design Build) (11375)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Design) (11364)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Digital Fabrication) (11369)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Offshore) (11365)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Reading Subject (69337)

This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding individual supervision. In addition, special permission of the Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) is required.

Specialised Valuation (16331)

This subject involves an in-depth study relating to a diverse range of specialised property types and the underpinning factors which lead to the creation of value in the same. The subject also considers special purpose valuations relating to strata and community title, stratum subdivision, heritage property, financial reporting and plant and equipment.

Sport and Exercise Internship (92551)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Sport and Exercise Science Practicum (92550)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Sports Media (57207)

In this capstone subject, students harness their skills and knowledge to produce a significant project of hands-on journalism, public relations or mass communication. Students drawn to the public communications side of this hybrid subject need to demonstrate a deep understanding and practical application of areas such as audience strategy, content marketing and crisis management.
On the journalism side, they are able to explore and use a wide variety of methods and mediums, including emerging areas of practice, to produce the high-end work at the centre of their project. With the assistance of a UTS or industry mentor, students are required to pitch the project’s concept for approval before undertaking a process of rigorous research, reporting and editing (and related tasks), before presenting their final work to a panel of industry professionals.

Statistical Design and Analysis (33116)

This subject focuses on data analysis. Students learn how to collect and analyse data, and how to draw valid conclusions from the data. The subject begins with a discussion of how to sample from a population, and how to describe the data collected. This is followed by a discussion of how to form and test hypotheses about the population using the data collected from the sample.

Strategic Management (21715)

This subject adopts a holistic strategic approach to the design of innovative business models and the development of integrative processes that promote competitive superiority. This capstone subject integrates and builds on the materials previously studied in the core subjects of the MBA.
The aim of the subject is to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary for designing and managing strategy processes that can assure the long-term viability and success of enterprises that operate in a highly competitive business environment. The strategy literature supports the adoption of a more creative, strategic and flexible approach to the design of business models. Students are encouraged to design innovative business solutions and develop new problem solving rationales for the formulation of flexible strategies. The students should then be able to understand, communicate and materially contribute to the purpose of an organisation.

Structural Anatomy (92511)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Student Learning and Teaching Approaches (010042)

Participants in this subject develop their understanding of key ideas from empirical research on student learning and teaching in higher education. This enables them to reflect on and review their teaching from the perspective of this research. This subject teaches participants to become more aware of students’ approaches to their learning; the influences of the learning environment on students’ approaches to learning; and relations between learning approaches and the quality of the learning outcome. Participants relate this to their approaches to teaching; the nature of good teaching; and teaching strategies which encourage high quality student learning. They will seek feedback on their own teaching from students and peers, and make use of this feedback and the research to plan changes to their teaching to improve the learning environment for students.

Systems Engineering for Managers (49004)

In the multidisciplinary process of problem solving in engineering, systems engineering is seen as a unifying discipline. Drawing on contemporary scholarship and best practice, the philosophy, concepts, techniques and tools of the systems engineering process are examined in the context of engineering management, and their domain of applicability explored. This subject provides extensive opportunity for individual and group encounter with the challenges of the systems approach, and is illustrated by case studies presented by guest lecturers.

Taxation Law (79017)

This subject aims to develop students’ conceptual and analytical skills and an appreciation of the Australian tax system. It provides a general analysis of the current tax system and consideration of the many changes it is presently undergoing. The course looks at the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, the Tax Law Reform Project and the New Tax System. Particular concepts to be considered include income and capital, assessable income, allowable deductions, capital gains tax, fringe benefits tax, goods and services tax, trusts, partnerships, tax accounting, tax planning and anti-avoidance provisions.

Technology, Methods and Creative Practice (81540)

This subject focuses on understanding how technology, methods and creative practice can provoke innovation. Participants’ own ideas for building and running a creative practice in the context of undertaking a central project for an external partner are challenged. Faced with that partner’s complex challenge, participants create propositions in a collaborative multidisciplinary environment, shape processes of discovery and exploration, generate solutions, develop visual literacy in dealing with complexity, and create frameworks for critiquing and judging proposals. The subject builds on values such as risk-taking and inquisitiveness, supporting participants’ research, and analytical and creative practice through developing compelling ways of communicating their concepts and ideas.

The Financial System (25556)

The aim of this subject is to develop an understanding of the operations of a modern financial system, covering its payment, financing and market-risk management activities. Its main topic areas are financial institutions, financial markets (such as stocks, bonds and foreign exchange) and derivatives (such as futures and options).

Tissue Engineering Scaffolds (91560)

Tissue engineering is a radical new concept for the treatment of disease and injury. It involves the use of the technologies of molecular and cell biology, combined with those of advanced materials science and processing, in order to produce tissue regeneration. This subject outlines concepts underlying the development of biomaterial scaffolds and tissue engineering-based products and aims to give students a theoretical and practical understanding of the tools available for developing such ‘systems’, as well as the biological, physical and chemical constraints of these systems.
This subject provides an introduction to the characterisation, analysis and design of biomaterials for the purposes of correcting deformities, restoring lost function, or promoting tissue regeneration in the human body. The principles of materials science, specifically the fundamental structure-function relationships of biomaterials, is explored, as they relate to the use of materials in the body. The subject also examines properties of biomaterials as they relate to minimising corrosion, controlling degradation and tailoring cell-material interaction to guide cell growth and tissue regeneration. Topics include structural properties of materials, characterisation of materials, tissue responses to implants, and designing materials for tissue engineering. Laboratory classes are used to allow students to gain practical experience with scaffold design, production and manipulations.

Transactional Practice (75422)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Sixth Schedule to the Legal Profession Admission Rules 2005. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise tasks in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.
This subject focuses on law, practice, procedure and skills to enable students to: conduct and advise on property transactions such as conveying torrens title and strata title residential property; advise on, create and release securities; advise on, create and transfer leases; identify revenue issues of property transactions; advise on land use, powers of attorneys, residential tenancies and options conduct and advise on commercial transactions such as the sale and purchase of a business; set up and advise on business structures and the continuing obligations in relation to those structures; identify revenue implications of commercial transactions and refer clients to appropriate expert advisers; advise on loans, securities and financing arrangements for commercial transactions.

Students also draft relevant documentation and analyse issues in clients’ problems as well as offering options and solutions. The subject encourages students to experience and reflect on the targeted Graduate Attributes developed by the faculty.

Transdisciplinary Project Development and Research (94661)

In this subject, participants collaborate in small teams and as a cohort on a selected field of study to develop and research a (small-scale) transdisciplinary initiative, using and extending the knowledge and practices they have developed in preceding subjects in the course. As part of that process they also design and produce an artefact or ‘boundary object’ (in some form related to transdisciplinary practice and drawing on earlier ideas) for testing in that initiative.
Alongside their development project, participants conduct and report on a small empirical study which trials their project; to examine the value that results from it, for example. They argue a case for their inquiry, explore and justify its methodology, and report their findings and implications in creative ways and to different stakeholders.

VC Alternative Photographic Practices (87569)

This subject requires students to experiment with a range of photographic capturing and processing techniques used in professional practice. With a focus on art direction and innovative problem-solving, students research and apply a range of digital and analogue photographic processes relevant to the theoretical and conceptual frameworks presented throughout the lectures. Through a series of practical exercises, students develop an understanding of experimental image-making, and photographic and visual narrative, and expand their ability to link their practice to a globally oriented visual communication context.

VC Designing Interactions: Physical Computing (87849)

The generic human-computer interface elements of screen, keyboard and mouse (and now touchscreen device) are usually core in the designing of digital interactions. This subject aims to extend students’ notion of interaction with computers beyond this typical set-up, to a broader and informed understanding of and engagement with computing itself (a practice generally known as physical computing).
In this subject, students learn how a small, simple computer called a micro-controller receives information from sensors and converts it into data; can make decisions based on the changes it reads through the structure of a program; and can activate, communicate with and control external outputs. The aim is to foster broader experimentation with what is possible in designing relationships between humans and/or environments and computers. Students explore physical computation and experiment with the tangibility and materiality of the interface, to apply and practically investigate concepts of interaction. Students learn how to build basic circuits, write programs, communicate between computers, and use an array of different sensors and control outputs.

VC Designing Interactions: User Experience Design (87749)

This subject introduces students to user experience design (UX), a practice where the future contexts and interrelationships (to humans, other objects, networks) of a designed product, service or environment, guide the design process. The ultimate intention of this method is the creation of a discernible design artefact and the shaping of both the user experience and the artefact’s conduct. User experience design can thus be broadly utilised as a methodology in the design process for any design outcome.
This subject aims to introduce students generally to UX design where it is specifically used in practice, in the design of digital products, services and environments such as websites, mobile applications and devices. Students are introduced to: researching users and contexts; how to use research to inform the design of the user interface and the flow of interactions between users, contexts and designed artefacts; and the iterative prototyping and evaluation of proposed solutions in real and prospective scenarios.

VC Digital Photomedia (87669)

This subject gives a brief overview of the basic principles of photography, but the primary focus is on students developing their skills to edit, manipulate and enhance digital imagery. Students undertake a series of exercises that hone their Photoshop skills, resulting in an understanding of the ways in which the digital representation of images can be altered and potential ethical implications of digital manipulation. Students are required to explore their skills through a concept-driven project, culminating in a series of images incorporating and expanding on the competencies developed throughout the weekly exercises. Students are strongly encouraged to take their own images and to think critically about the role of the image within the scope of visual communication.

VC Global Studio: Visual Communication A (88871)

The study tour in Japan aims to provide students with the opportunity to experience a culture that has a deep and embedded engagement with design and aesthetics. It explores traditional and contemporary culture in Tokyo, Kyoto and Naoshima. While this is a visual communication subject, the tour encompasses all aspects of design: fashion, architecture, interiors, performance, etc. In addition to visiting museums, galleries and special exhibitions, there is an emphasis on tours of contemporary and traditional artisanal studios, and experiencing the general cultural fabric of Japan. Design at a very high level is incorporated into many everyday aspects of life in Japan and for this reason experiencing daily life is, in itself, a design education.

VC Global Studio: Visual Communication B (88872)

The visual communication program emphasises international networking to build a global perspective within an individual’s design practice. The global studio provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another design and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake experiences such as study tours, collaborations with students from overseas institutions and working with local communities in foreign countries.

VC Illustration 1: Media and Techniques (88304)

In this subject, students gain an understanding of illustration as a tool for communication. Students experiment with a wide range of illustrative media and techniques in studio sessions, and further experiment in their own time by responding to project briefs. Students from different design majors find that this subject has wide-ranging relevance. Workshops, demonstrations and practical tasks are given in a range of techniques and applications. Although there are no prerequisites, students are expected to have basic drawing skills. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Illustration: Visual Narrative (88604)

Having developed an understanding of illustration techniques as a tool for communication, students now harness this knowledge to acquire experience illustrating for comics and other visual narratives. In this subject, students produce a series of experimental visual narratives in print and digital formats. Workshops and practical tasks in studio sessions focus on different methods of interpreting written texts to illustrate them, and professional time management skills. Students learn to respond to critique and incorporate feedback into their illustrative work. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Moving Image Design: Animation (88308)

This subject introduces students to the fundamental principles of animation within a design context. Topics covered include animation principles, animation techniques, background design, timing, framing, camera techniques, storyboard formats and production processes. Students develop an understanding of movement, layout and composition. Students are taught to communicate ideas through animation, to develop a pitch bible, and to create short animations. Students continue to develop their analytical skills, critically reflecting on the development of their work and its context. The studios are a mix of lecture and practical exercises. Lectures explore the historical and technical developments and contemporary uses of animation in the context of visual communication design. Students engage in practical activities and collaborative peer group feedback sessions, with assistance by studio leaders. In addition to the subject outline, students are given briefing documents for each of the three individual projects and their assessable items.

VC Moving Image Design: Video (87659)

This subject explores moving image through genres such as documentary, short narrative film and the articulation of content through moving images. Students are encouraged to address narrative structures, conceptual frameworks, realisation and contextualisation. Students are introduced to current work practices in digital video planning and production, and gain hands-on experience with the technology involved in recording and capturing live footage, compositing footage/graphics, colour-grading, and soundtrack design. Students learn to respond to critique and incorporate feedback into their illustrative work. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Pre-press and Print Production (87007)

This subject explores the creative potential of print media and gives an overview of the main print technologies in the industry. Topics covered include: the design and production process for print; digital printing versus offset printing; paper and stock; colour management (colour and ink); embellishments and binding; die lines and packaging, and other pre-press tasks such as imposition, colour settings, dot gain management and trapping. Students develop a professional die line, produce packaging mock-ups of a professional standard and learn to produce print-ready artwork that includes print embellishments, with an emphasis on refined typography and image reproduction. This subject aims to give practical experience in the problems involved, and the solutions available, in preparing files for print, and to develop proficiency in the relevant software packages.

VC Special Project A (87500)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and/or practice. Such opportunities may include but are not limited to: visual-communication competitions, master-class projects run by leading industry professionals, and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Special Project B (87600)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and/or practice. Such opportunities may include but are not limited to: visual-communication competitions, master-class projects run by leading industry professionals, and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Special Project Honours (87700)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and practice. Such opportunities may include, but are not limited to, visual communication competitions, masterclass projects run by leading industry professionals and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed, and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Webmedia 1 (87539)

Today the web has a pervasive presence in our lives; through it we access information, communicate, connect, experience. There are many facets of design involved in generating content for the web: interface design; information design; information architecture; user experience design; interaction design, etc. Through this subject students gain a basic understanding of some of these facets of design and the production of content for websites. The design environment of the screen – the constraints and considerations – is explored.
Students learn to apply their existing design skills and understanding of design principles and elements to design for the web. Using design as a conduit, students communicate information on the web through the integrated use of text, image and other media elements. Publishing content on the web is an integral step in the introduction to web media. Technically this course introduces the basic technologies of client-side web development working with HTML and CSS. These are the basic underlying mechanisms for realising creative online content.

Venture Planning and Pitching (21943)

This is the capstone subject for the Graduate Certificate in Venture Acceleration in the Master of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship. The subject is about creating or re-thinking an entrepreneurial proposal around a clear customer need. Students develop the building blocks of their venture by aligning resources, processes and revenue streams with a new value proposition. The aim of this subject is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required for designing, testing, improving, and re-designing business models. While applying skills of strategic analysis, planning and decision-making, students work creatively towards a proposal pitch.

Work Integrated Learning 1 (41037)

This subject is designed to enhance and broaden the experiential learning of students concurrently with their internship. Students employed in a particular organisation typically experience a relatively narrow range of tasks and professional culture within that organisation. Through a series of compulsory and optional elective modules in this subject, students broaden their experience and understanding of professional practice in the context of their chosen field of practice.

Work Integrated Learning 2 (41047)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html