The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) is dedicated to practice-oriented teaching in communication and media, languages and culture, and education. During the summer session, FASS is offering a wide variety of subjects (with over 25 to choose from) that can contribute to courses in Communication, Education and International studies. There’s also a variety of university wide electives that you may be interested in.

Have a browse through the FASS flyer to see what appeals to you during Summer at UTS.

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Academic English: Communication Fundamentals (59720)

Academic English is a specific style of English used at university. You’ll hear it in lectures and tutorials, and you’ll also be expected to use it when you write your assessments, give oral presentations and participate in class discussions. Academic English: Communication Fundamentals has been designed to help you take your language skills to the next level. Perhaps you need some support after achieving Band 1 in OPELA; your tutor has encouraged you to take the subject; or you wish to develop a clear understanding of how academic communication works. Whatever the reason, the subject will give you an introduction to the nature of effective spoken and written communication in academic contexts. 

Academic English: Communication Fundamentals (59721)

Academic English is a specific style of English used at university. You’ll hear it in lectures and tutorials, and you’ll also be expected to use it when you write your assessments, give oral presentations and participate in class discussions. Academic English: Communication Fundamentals has been designed to help you take your language skills to the next level. Perhaps you need some support after achieving Band 1 in OPELA; your tutor has encouraged you to take the subject; or you wish to develop a clear understanding of how academic communication works. Whatever the reason, the subject will give you an introduction to the nature of effective spoken and written communication in academic contexts. 

Chinese Culture and Heritage (97113)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Chinese Festivals and Ceremonies (97111)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Communicating Difference (54002)

This subject brings together a range of disciplines within communications to examine cultural difference, social identity, frameworks for promoting diversity, and contemporary community formation. In particular, case studies from contemporary Australian society are used to explore themes of racialisation, multiculturalism, gender, sexuality, and class-based inequalities, with a particular focus on Indigenous Australian and settler colonial identities.
Case studies are drawn from a variety of cultural sites that engage with diversity and difference, from popular culture (such as film and television) to institutional diversity policies and social activism. This includes an opportunity to examine Sydney-based initiatives that seek to address marginalisation, promote activism, encourage community participation or extract commercial value from diversity. Through developing original ideas and projects for engaging with diversity and difference, students are invited to reflect upon their own identities from a cultural perspective.

The subject also familiarises students with relevant theories and concepts, critical media studies, critical race and feminist theory, cultural geography, critical diversity studies and organisational studies. In developing frameworks for understanding inequalities, the subject equips students to evaluate the ethical dimensions of contemporary professional practices in diverse working environments.

Communicating with Publics (57023)

In this subject, students analyse the social construction of publics and organisation-public relationships. They study different models of public relations practice and draw on current theories about publics, audience and media to help them understand the development of strategies to communicate with internal and external publics. There is a strong focus on identifying the ethical implications of decisions, actions and outcomes in communicating with publics. Students are encouraged to participate in a discussion on approaches to empowering or influencing publics. The attitudes, knowledges, behaviours and issue positions of various publics are studied to enable students to assess how best to communicate with them. Students learn about different research strategies for understanding communicating with publics.

Course Design and Assessment (010043)

This subject aims to develop university teachers’ ability to design courses and subjects that provide an environment for meaningful student learning in higher education. The subject looks at the context within which subjects and courses are developed and how course design policies shape the development of course goals and subject objectives. Participants in the subject develop an understanding of the principles of constructive alignment (Biggs, 2003) as a method for achieving consistency between objectives assessment, and teaching and learning activities. Participants relate the features of effective assessment to their own subject design, with attention to issues of equity, validity, the involvement of students in assessment choices, marking efficiencies, and the provision of effective feedback on student work. This subject enables university teachers to explore a range of methods for improving courses and subjects in order to ensure an effective learning environment for students.

Culture: Plugged and Unplugged (54092)

This subject explores the historical meanings of ‘culture’, locating how the term has been used variously to refer to artistic production (e.g. sound culture, painting, dance); modes of communication (e.g. analogue, digital); the way of life of a people (e.g. Indigenous culture, everyday life); and forms of identity (e.g. street culture, queer, Goth). Students explore these diverse meanings and forms of culture, identifying how they position individuals, groups and communities. They will also look at the political and ethical consequences of these positionings, as well as how they articulate the values and beliefs of the society and individuals that produce and use them.
At the same time students create and explore their own cultural texts in order to understand how the meanings they experience as viewers or listeners are created in practice. These texts may take the form of writing, visuals, sound or movement, depending on the interests of individual students. In each case, the key concern is an exploration of how these texts articulate or respond to the social context in which they are produced.

Digital Sports Journalism (57205)

This subject equips students with the skills required for reporting, analysis and audience engagement in digital environments across sporting codes and institutions. Students examine the changing nature of sports journalism, the business of sport and rise of the ‘informed fan’ as a powerful force of both journalistic opportunity and media disruption.
Students work with experienced sports journalists and gain hands-on reporting experience via UTS’ unique partnership with the SCG Trust and other industry relationships. They examine how the nature of sports journalism is changing, and the intersection of sport, politics and the multiple ethical, legal and policy issues that arise in the area. Industry leaders, sports stars and other guest lecturers provide students with practical guidance and insights about building a career in sports journalism and related disciplines.

Environmental Communication (54094)

This subject explores the strategies through which citizens, corporations, public officials, journalists, artists, environmental groups and Indigenous people strive to influence public debate and shape important decisions that affect the future of the planet. While many environmental controversies hinge on scientific evidence, decisions about what to do turn on how that evidence is communicated, and on perceptions of science, technology and nature in the public sphere.
This subject focuses on climate change as a fundamental challenge in environmental communication. Students are introduced to key theories, concepts and practices in science communication, risk anticipation, environmental policy and environmental studies. They analyse how knowledge of existing and anticipated environmental hazard is communicated in public forums; the often unexamined cultural and ideological commitments embedded in talk about the environment; and the ways that ignorance and uncertainty (lack of knowledge, secrecy, disinformation) can be manipulated to shape public opinion and set policy agendas.

Students research and analyse case studies and/or develop their own environmental communication projects across a range of local and international environmental issues. Framing the different topics explored in this subject is the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’ which has become increasingly influential in both the human and natural sciences. This is the notion that we as a species have entered a new geological epoch in which – intentionally or otherwise – humankind is dramatically altering the geology, ecology, evolution and climate of the Earth.

Exchange Elective 1 (Education) (10140)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 2 (Education) (10141)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 3 (Education) (10142)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Elective 4 (Education) (10143)

Further information on this subject is available from UTS: Education.

Exchange Subject A (50720)

The UTS International Exchange program, administered by UTS: International Studies, offers students the option of completing part of their study in another country and receiving credit towards their degree at UTS. UTS: Communication participates in this program, under which students have the opportunity to undertake study at an exchange partner university.
Applicants for exchange must have their study at the exchange partner university approved by UTS: Communication’s international coordinator. The subject studied at the exchange partner university should have relevance to a student’s course of study, and be taught and assessed in an acceptable format.

Exchange Subject D (50723)

The UTS International Exchange program, administered by UTS: International Studies, offers students the option of completing part of their study in another country and receiving credit towards their degree at UTS. UTS: Communication participates in this program, under which students have the opportunity to undertake study at an exchange partner university.
Applicants for exchange must have their study at the exchange partner university approved by UTS: Communication’s international coordinator. The subject studied at the exchange partner university should have relevance to a student’s course of study, and be taught and assessed in an acceptable format.

Global Cinema (54081)

This subject focuses on key developments in global cinema with an emphasis on films that challenge students to think critically and creatively about the world in which they live. Through an engagement with films from a range of national and cultural contexts, students develop a critical vocabulary for thinking about the role that cinema can play in cultivating an ethically-minded mode of engagement via which the status quo is called into question. Drawing on recent debates in screen studies, students reflect on the role that innovations in film form can play in prompting audiences to consider how, and with what effects, the world could be transformed for the better.

Media Arts Project (54035)

This is the capstone project for the Media Arts and Production major. Students develop and complete a small media arts project, e.g. sound, moving image, interactive, installation or performance. They can consider a range of distribution modes for the project such as online, broadcast, theatrical or other hybrid models. Students may undertake this subject in a variety of ways. They can produce a short media work in either sound, video, interactive media, installation, performance or film with encouragement to explore the possibilities of convergent media. They can form small collaborative associations and work as a team to produce a work of greater scope or complexity. Or, they can develop their skills in a specific production area or crew role and undertake this role on several projects across the session.

Media Arts Project Capstone (57180)

In this subject, students complete an individual original short project (in film, video, television, online, sound, radio, performance and installation or multi-platform) via taking significant creative crew roles on a number of projects agreed by your lecturer by working in groups of two or three to make one original short project. The completed project should demonstrate the student’s advanced professional skills and creative expertise.
The project must be successfully completed during the session, although it may have been developed and commenced during the Research and Development subject or equivalent Scriptwriting subject. It must be feasible to be produced within the resources available both through UTS and those provided by the student from outside UTS. The proposed project must be approved by your lecturer. Students are required to submit critical documentation (approximately 3000 words) of their research, production development and production process to accompany the final project. This documentation should demonstrate the student’s critical relationship to their media production practice.

This subject differs from the Research and Development subject in that it is expected that the completed project work is conceptually and creatively challenging. The production and/or post-production process should be considerably more demanding and the resulting project should show evidence of the student as a media arts program maker. The subject is conducted by class and individual supervision by your lecturer.

Media Power (54080)

Media power shapes individual and social environments from womb to tomb and beyond, raising questions about who controls our media lives: corporations or citizens? Governments or revolutionaries? Working in teams, students use classic and cutting-edge media studies concepts to debate current media controversies such as privacy, trolling, cyberdating, manipulation, activism, ownership, avatars, diversity, and digital addictions to TV series, social media and games. Students will acquire new skills in critical appraisal, research design, analysis and research reporting. They will also develop powerful research questions, and design and conduct original and ethical research projects.
In this subject, students will investigate key aspects of media audiences, producers, communities, media practice and power structures; and build their research capacity for future media research careers, honours studies and beyond. Practical research skills are combined with communication practice in this media studies subject investigating media power.

Professional Internship (54091)

Students develop a structured industry experience project in the area of their major study. This involves the negotiation of a learning contract to identify the outcomes of such experience and to design a detailed program of activities to achieve these outcomes. Supervision is provided to assist students in identifying the capabilities they need to develop and to provide support and advice during their industry involvement. Students are assisted to reflect on their workplace learning experience in the context of their chosen field of study.

Sports Media (57207)

In this capstone subject, students harness their skills and knowledge to produce a significant project of hands-on journalism, public relations or mass communication. Students drawn to the public communications side of this hybrid subject need to demonstrate a deep understanding and practical application of areas such as audience strategy, content marketing and crisis management.
On the journalism side, they are able to explore and use a wide variety of methods and mediums, including emerging areas of practice, to produce the high-end work at the centre of their project. With the assistance of a UTS or industry mentor, students are required to pitch the project’s concept for approval before undertaking a process of rigorous research, reporting and editing (and related tasks), before presenting their final work to a panel of industry professionals.