The Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building (DAB) aims to contribute to the transformation of urban life, contemporary design culture and the built environment through our research, education and engagement with the professions. During Summer at UTS, DAB will be offering over 53 subjects where students will have the opportunity to work closely with Industry experts, take a field trip to exemplars of Australian architecture or even attend a series of guided workshops. If you’d like to know more about what DAB has on offer during Summer at UTS, have a read through the flyer, scroll through the subjects below and visit the UTS timetable planner.

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Advanced Building Regulation (15615)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Analogue Photography (88011)

This subject introduces students to working with film cameras and the black and white darkroom. It offers a hands-on and immersive experience of making photographs. Building on, and complementing, prerequisite understandings of manual camera functions and image design, students explore analogue practices of film exposure and development, print enlargement and experimental darkroom techniques.

Architecture Special Project (11307)

This subject develops the tool of drawing as a powerful disciplinary device in architecture, to both explore design ideas (creative thinking) as well as to express ideas to others (communication). Through different exercises, the student develops the skill of creating narratives and the graphic tools to translate them into powerful, communicative drawings. During the process, the tool of drawing itself is explored as a medium to manage complexity and connect the world of ideas with their form. Students gain an understanding of the narrative building process, its graphical translation, and the capability to generate graphic documents to express intentional information both accurate and suggestive, operative and seductive; skills to be applied on subsequent design studios as well as in professional architectural practice.

Architecture Special Project UG (Communications) (11320)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Design) (11321)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Global) (11322)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Technology) (11323)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Architecture Special Project UG (Theory) (11324)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Australian Architecture Since 1930 PG (11228)

The subject introduces key themes in Australian architecture. It is framed in terms of case studies dating from 1930 until the beginning of the 21st century. The subject addresses the continuing themes of architecture: the role of precedent; Australia’s concept of ‘self’ and ‘nationhood’; understandings of the primitive and the past; spatial politics as it effects architectural form; the relation to nature and the natural; the relation to urban order and architecture’s role in the city; the symbolism, iconography and cultural narrative of architectural form; and the role of the individual architects in the development of the profession. Each theme investigated opens important attributes in the visual dialogue developed between past and present, international developments and Australia.

A selected series of case studies are visited during the subject. These are in either a self-guided or group tour mode. There is an expectation that students undertake a five-day excursion to Melbourne as part of their studies.

Australian Architecture Since 1930 UG (11210)

The subject introduces key themes in Australian architecture. It is framed in terms of case studies dating from 1930 until the beginning of the 21st century. The subject addresses the continuing themes of architecture: the role of precedent; Australia’s concept of ‘self’ and ‘nationhood’; understandings of the primitive and the past; spatial politics as it effects architectural form; the relation to nature and the natural; the relation to urban order and architecture’s role in the city; the symbolism, iconography and cultural narrative of architectural form; and the role of the individual architects in the development of the profession.

Each theme investigated opens important attributes in the visual dialogue developed between past and present, international developments and Australia. A selected series of case studies is visited during the subject. These are in either a self-guided or group tour mode. There is an expectation that students undertake a five-day excursion to Melbourne as part of their studies.

Construction Project Management Special Project 1 (16907)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Construction Project Management Special Project 2 (16908)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Construction Project Management Special Project 3 (16909)

This subject requires students to demonstrate self-directed learning in the pursuit of a project of their own choice, or one offered by the program. Advice from an academic supervisor assists students to select, refine and complete their particular project. The subject is only available to students who are capable of undertaking independent study, and students intending to take the subject must gain approval and agreement from an academic supervisor, and the program director, prior to enrolment. The number, nature and timing of the assessment items is normally negotiated between the supervisor and the student, and administered via learning contract.
This flexible learning approach allows for students to examine an area of special interest in detail, and to independently explore, beyond a basic level of understanding, the selected subject matter. Projects may respond to special conditions within the program, the faculty, the community, or contemporary construction project management practice. The range of projects is limited by the capacity of the program and the academic supervisor to provide appropriate support to the student and to facilitate optimum study conditions.

Contemporary Local Government Leadership (15618)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Design in Asia (85800)

In recent times, there has been growing recognition of the role of design in fostering vibrant local economies and communities in Asia, and in the development of creative industries across the region. This subject introduces students to the highly disparate design cultures in Asia, and develops their knowledge of cross-cultural design practice in a collaborative and interdisciplinary setting. Focusing on design practices, issues and contexts in East and South-East Asia, the subject foregrounds national and regional traditions as well as the transnational networks and connections within which they are embedded.

Design Study Tour (88617)

This studio promotes cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural engagement within the discipline of interior and spatial design by constructing a studio environment in an international context. The studio aims to build upon students’ skills of investigation, documentation, analysis, and creative response by repositioning the studio in foreign geographic territory. The studio facilitates international cultural exchange by interacting with societies and stakeholders outside of the Australian context. It also promotes interdisciplinary activities through its engagement with external design programs.

Enhancing Local Government Service Delivery (15622)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Exhibition Design: Practice (88323)

This subject explores furniture design in a workshop setting. Students design and fabricate furniture with the aim of producing a full scale prototype of the design. Students are introduced to the design process in furniture, utilising analytical and intuitive thinking to solve design problems, employing both graphic means and three-dimensional models to express ideas. Further, students are introduced to the skills, attitudes and behaviours required in a shop setting for the fabrication of the project. Classroom lectures survey furniture design from the 1880s to the present, focusing on design histories, theories and technical matters. Students learn how to work with a variety of materials and manufacturing techniques in workshops that address the successful completion of their project.

Exhibition Design: Practice 1 (88323)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Global Innovation Studio A (81517)

This Innovation Leadership program emphasises international networking and excursions or study tours in building a global perspective to group and individual engagement and practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another innovative, entrepreneurial and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive educational projects and experiences with students from overseas institutions, and utilising established international relationships.

Global Innovation Studio B (81518)

This Innovation Leadership program emphasises international networking and excursions or study tours in building a global perspective to group and individual engagement and practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another innovative, entrepreneurial and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive educational projects and experiences with students from overseas institutions, and utilising established international relationships.

Global Studio: Design Animation B (88822)

In this subject, students engage in an overseas study visit in order to gain a broader understanding of their chosen discipline. This subject offers an important insight into the global animation scene, and exposes students to a diverse series of approaches to animation. Students learn about different cultures, experience alternative attitudes towards the production and consumption of animation, and meet practitioners, educators and fellow students.

Global Studio: Fashion and Textiles A (88831)

The Fashion and Textile program emphasises international networking and visits/excursions/study tours in building a global perspective to an individual’s practice. This subject provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another design and educational culture, developing creative as well as personal maturity. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake intensive fashion and textiles studios with students from overseas institutions. Through established relationships with international design schools, projects are undertaken with local students and practitioners.

Industrial Design Special Project (84000)

Industrial design covers a diverse and complex range of issues dealing with the human condition and the built environment. Due to this diversity and complexity, practitioners generally specialise within a sector of the industry. This subject offers students the opportunity to gain a highly developed and detailed understanding of a specialised or specific area of industrial design practice. Entry into this subject is based on the capabilities of the individual student and the appropriateness of the proposed study.
Students engage with a specific project through a supervised self-directed learning contract that offers a flexible learning approach. Projects may respond to community and faculty needs or to the individual student’s preferred direction in their academic and career development. This subject may only be undertaken following consultation with, and approval by, the course director.

Interdisciplinary Lab B (85302)

In this subject, design is conceived in its widest and most exciting sense; as an agent for change in a complex world. The aim is to connect students with live research projects led by experienced design researchers and often connected to industry or community partners. The subject presents assessments that require an interdisciplinary design approach and develop students’ skills in collaboration and teamwork. The emphasis is on experimentation and exploring new contexts for design practice.

International Construction (16074)

This subject aims to introduce students to construction industry structure, practices and methods of construction adopted in various parts of the world. The subject covers current practices and future trends in various countries, and international approaches to construction procurement, management practices and construction resource availability, requirement and usage. It also covers the impact of local economic, labour and technical parameters on construction management; staffing for international projects; and areas of competitive advantage in international construction.

Introduction to Photography (88805)

This subject covers the basic principles of camera functions and digital photography. Students explore the design elements of images, creative and innovative approaches to conceiving photographs, and ways of developing visual awareness. Digital cameras are used to document the world, build a visual archive and communicate observations and ideas.

Introduction to Photography for Design and Architecture (88801)

This subject covers the basic principles of camera functions and digital photography. Students explore the design elements of images, creative and innovative approaches to conceiving photographs, and ways of developing visual awareness. Digital cameras are used to document the world, build a visual archive and communicate observations and ideas.

Modern American Architecture (11195)

Through fieldwork, and photographic and drawn analysis, students consider the relationship between the diverse practices of architecture and American modernity. They also question the relevance of theories of modernity on contemporary architectural practices. The subject develops students’ ability to understand architecture as built form through experiencing key case studies from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in North America. Themes considered may include influences from Europe; technologies influencing new design attitudes; the importance of the domestic dwelling unit and single houses in modern considerations of spatial division; the impact of print media and exhibition on architectural attitudes; and the link between architecture and contemporary art practices.

Photography in Architecture (11318)

This subject introduces students to photography’s historic, aesthetic, technical and contemporary role in architecture. Through lectures, workshops and practical assignments, the fundamental principles of photography are addressed, practiced and appreciated. This provides a sound framework to begin investigating architectural photography techniques and methodology, and its function in the practice of architecture. Key objectives include: reinforcing fundamental photographic principles such as composition, light, movement and form; developing sound methodological practice; experiencing the vagaries of location conditions and how to manage them; pre- and post-production considerations; and appreciating the historic and contemporary relevance of photography.
The subject provides a balance between lecture-based learning, studio workshops, tutorial critiques, practical demonstrations and location assignments. It aims to fine-tune photographic composition and technique, while developing an understanding and appreciation for architectural photography and its role in the practice of design.

Social Planning and Community Development (15602)

For further details, contact UTS Short Courses.

Special Project (Design Build) (11375)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Design) (11364)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Digital Fabrication) (11369)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following the successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Special Project (Offshore) (11365)

This subject is offered as an elective, intensive block-mode studio or approved self-directed individual study plan. The areas of study in the special project domain may include design, theory, technology, communications, client-commissioned live projects or a designated field of study that includes a compulsory overseas study visit. This flexible learning approach enables students to examine a defined area of study in greater detail and develop increased knowledge, expertise and skills that support specific academic and career development.
Projects that are offered may respond to special conditions in the community; be client- or industry-initiated; or relate to the disciplinary interests and research agendas of the faculty. Enrolment in this subject is contingent on the nature of the project being delivered. Individual projects are granted in negotiation with the supervising academic and require the approval of the course director. Students must demonstrate that they have a viable project, effective study plan and appropriate academic supervision. Participation in group and intensive block-mode studios is capped at 12 students unless otherwise approved by the coordinating academic. Participation in global or travelling programs is by invitation only following successful attendance of candidates at formal briefing sessions.

Specialised Valuation (16331)

This subject involves an in-depth study relating to a diverse range of specialised property types and the underpinning factors which lead to the creation of value in the same. The subject also considers special purpose valuations relating to strata and community title, stratum subdivision, heritage property, financial reporting and plant and equipment.

VC Alternative Photographic Practices (87569)

This subject requires students to experiment with a range of photographic capturing and processing techniques used in professional practice. With a focus on art direction and innovative problem-solving, students research and apply a range of digital and analogue photographic processes relevant to the theoretical and conceptual frameworks presented throughout the lectures. Through a series of practical exercises, students develop an understanding of experimental image-making, and photographic and visual narrative, and expand their ability to link their practice to a globally oriented visual communication context.

VC Designing Interactions: Physical Computing (87849)

The generic human-computer interface elements of screen, keyboard and mouse (and now touchscreen device) are usually core in the designing of digital interactions. This subject aims to extend students’ notion of interaction with computers beyond this typical set-up, to a broader and informed understanding of and engagement with computing itself (a practice generally known as physical computing).
In this subject, students learn how a small, simple computer called a micro-controller receives information from sensors and converts it into data; can make decisions based on the changes it reads through the structure of a program; and can activate, communicate with and control external outputs. The aim is to foster broader experimentation with what is possible in designing relationships between humans and/or environments and computers. Students explore physical computation and experiment with the tangibility and materiality of the interface, to apply and practically investigate concepts of interaction. Students learn how to build basic circuits, write programs, communicate between computers, and use an array of different sensors and control outputs.

VC Designing Interactions: User Experience Design (87749)

This subject introduces students to user experience design (UX), a practice where the future contexts and interrelationships (to humans, other objects, networks) of a designed product, service or environment, guide the design process. The ultimate intention of this method is the creation of a discernible design artefact and the shaping of both the user experience and the artefact’s conduct. User experience design can thus be broadly utilised as a methodology in the design process for any design outcome.
This subject aims to introduce students generally to UX design where it is specifically used in practice, in the design of digital products, services and environments such as websites, mobile applications and devices. Students are introduced to: researching users and contexts; how to use research to inform the design of the user interface and the flow of interactions between users, contexts and designed artefacts; and the iterative prototyping and evaluation of proposed solutions in real and prospective scenarios.

VC Digital Photomedia (87669)

This subject gives a brief overview of the basic principles of photography, but the primary focus is on students developing their skills to edit, manipulate and enhance digital imagery. Students undertake a series of exercises that hone their Photoshop skills, resulting in an understanding of the ways in which the digital representation of images can be altered and potential ethical implications of digital manipulation. Students are required to explore their skills through a concept-driven project, culminating in a series of images incorporating and expanding on the competencies developed throughout the weekly exercises. Students are strongly encouraged to take their own images and to think critically about the role of the image within the scope of visual communication.

VC Global Studio: Visual Communication A (88871)

The study tour in Japan aims to provide students with the opportunity to experience a culture that has a deep and embedded engagement with design and aesthetics. It explores traditional and contemporary culture in Tokyo, Kyoto and Naoshima. While this is a visual communication subject, the tour encompasses all aspects of design: fashion, architecture, interiors, performance, etc. In addition to visiting museums, galleries and special exhibitions, there is an emphasis on tours of contemporary and traditional artisanal studios, and experiencing the general cultural fabric of Japan. Design at a very high level is incorporated into many everyday aspects of life in Japan and for this reason experiencing daily life is, in itself, a design education.

VC Global Studio: Visual Communication B (88872)

The visual communication program emphasises international networking to build a global perspective within an individual’s design practice. The global studio provides students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in another design and educational culture. A selection of global studios are offered, allowing students to undertake experiences such as study tours, collaborations with students from overseas institutions and working with local communities in foreign countries.

VC Illustration 1: Media and Techniques (88304)

In this subject, students gain an understanding of illustration as a tool for communication. Students experiment with a wide range of illustrative media and techniques in studio sessions, and further experiment in their own time by responding to project briefs. Students from different design majors find that this subject has wide-ranging relevance. Workshops, demonstrations and practical tasks are given in a range of techniques and applications. Although there are no prerequisites, students are expected to have basic drawing skills. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Illustration: Visual Narrative (88604)

Having developed an understanding of illustration techniques as a tool for communication, students now harness this knowledge to acquire experience illustrating for comics and other visual narratives. In this subject, students produce a series of experimental visual narratives in print and digital formats. Workshops and practical tasks in studio sessions focus on different methods of interpreting written texts to illustrate them, and professional time management skills. Students learn to respond to critique and incorporate feedback into their illustrative work. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Moving Image Design: Animation (88308)

This subject introduces students to the fundamental principles of animation within a design context. Topics covered include animation principles, animation techniques, background design, timing, framing, camera techniques, storyboard formats and production processes. Students develop an understanding of movement, layout and composition. Students are taught to communicate ideas through animation, to develop a pitch bible, and to create short animations. Students continue to develop their analytical skills, critically reflecting on the development of their work and its context. The studios are a mix of lecture and practical exercises. Lectures explore the historical and technical developments and contemporary uses of animation in the context of visual communication design. Students engage in practical activities and collaborative peer group feedback sessions, with assistance by studio leaders. In addition to the subject outline, students are given briefing documents for each of the three individual projects and their assessable items.

VC Moving Image Design: Video (87659)

This subject explores moving image through genres such as documentary, short narrative film and the articulation of content through moving images. Students are encouraged to address narrative structures, conceptual frameworks, realisation and contextualisation. Students are introduced to current work practices in digital video planning and production, and gain hands-on experience with the technology involved in recording and capturing live footage, compositing footage/graphics, colour-grading, and soundtrack design. Students learn to respond to critique and incorporate feedback into their illustrative work. Students are expected to undertake visual research and critical analysis as part of this subject.

VC Pre-press and Print Production (87007)

This subject explores the creative potential of print media and gives an overview of the main print technologies in the industry. Topics covered include: the design and production process for print; digital printing versus offset printing; paper and stock; colour management (colour and ink); embellishments and binding; die lines and packaging, and other pre-press tasks such as imposition, colour settings, dot gain management and trapping. Students develop a professional die line, produce packaging mock-ups of a professional standard and learn to produce print-ready artwork that includes print embellishments, with an emphasis on refined typography and image reproduction. This subject aims to give practical experience in the problems involved, and the solutions available, in preparing files for print, and to develop proficiency in the relevant software packages.

VC Special Project A (87500)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and/or practice. Such opportunities may include but are not limited to: visual-communication competitions, master-class projects run by leading industry professionals, and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Special Project B (87600)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and/or practice. Such opportunities may include but are not limited to: visual-communication competitions, master-class projects run by leading industry professionals, and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Special Project Honours (87700)

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and practice. Such opportunities may include, but are not limited to, visual communication competitions, masterclass projects run by leading industry professionals and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed, and framed by an individually designed learning contract. Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

VC Webmedia 1 (87539)

Today the web has a pervasive presence in our lives; through it we access information, communicate, connect, experience. There are many facets of design involved in generating content for the web: interface design; information design; information architecture; user experience design; interaction design, etc. Through this subject students gain a basic understanding of some of these facets of design and the production of content for websites. The design environment of the screen – the constraints and considerations – is explored.
Students learn to apply their existing design skills and understanding of design principles and elements to design for the web. Using design as a conduit, students communicate information on the web through the integrated use of text, image and other media elements. Publishing content on the web is an integral step in the introduction to web media. Technically this course introduces the basic technologies of client-side web development working with HTML and CSS. These are the basic underlying mechanisms for realising creative online content.