In addition to the 40 FEIT subjects listed below, we are currently planning a number of intensive studios to be offered to FEIT students from 22 January to 2 March.

Using a range of experts and industry and community partners as facilitators, the studio subjects will present students with real-world problems to work on, enhancing teamwork, communication, design and problem-solving skills. Bringing learning to authentic challenges is integral to how students learn at UTS.

Have a look through the below subjects to see what takes your interest, and if you’re near the student centres or FEIT building, why not pick up a brochure?

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Capstone Project Part B (48026)

This subject is intended for students who wish to undertake a 12-credit-point Capstone Project over two sessions. Students enrol in Capstone Project Part A in the first session and this subject in the second.

Contaminated Site and Waste Remediation (49116)

There is an increasing need to identify, investigate and then remediate contaminated sites. Practitioners should be able to conceptualise these systems in order to predict contaminant distribution, fate and transport. This can be technically challenging due to complex biogeophysical interactions between waste, rocks, water and microbes along with uncertainties associated with defining these systems.
This subject provides students with an opportunity to undertake a detailed site investigation and modelling activity on a complex hypothetical contaminated site. This will enable them to gain experience in designing a soil/groundwater investigation and sampling program, along with predicting contaminant behaviour through descriptive and numerical modelling. An integral part of the subject is presenting these project outcomes in professionally relevant ways.

Electronics and Circuits (48520)

The main objective of this subject is to familiarise students with basic electronic circuits, mainly with op-amps as active elements, and their applications. By the end of the subject, students should have acquired reasonable proficiency in the analysis of basic electronic circuits and be able to build and test circuits in the laboratory. Particular emphasis is placed on the practical, hands-on aspect of electronics to provide a solid working knowledge for basic analogue electronic circuits using op-amps.
Laboratory work is a significant proportion of in-class delivery so as to make students proficient in circuit construction, testing, troubleshooting and to give them a sound knowledge of the use of test instruments. Another objective is to show that practical electronic applications are relevant to other engineering and technical disciplines and may often be placed within a wider social or commercial context.

Engineering Experience 2 (48130)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Mechanics (48321)

This subject aims to assist students to acquire a fundamental understanding of static equilibrium concepts commonly used in analysis and design of engineered structures. It also aims to develop their skills in analysing simple structures such as statically determinate beams and trusses, subjected to various loading and support conditions.
On completion of this subject, students should be able to apply static equilibrium conditions as tools to analyse simple structures, and have developed an appreciation of design in civil engineering. The principles developed in this subject form the basis of structural analysis and design. This subject introduces students to the fundamental aspects that are a basis for subsequent fields of dynamics in civil engineering such as fluid mechanics, hydraulics and road design.

Engineering Practice in an Australian Context (42015)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Practice Preparation 1 (41035)

This early-stage undergraduate subject helps initiate students to the engineering workplace by guiding them through the employment process; developing the communication and documentation skills appropriate to engineering practice; showing them how to learn through experience; exploring the nature and culture of the workplace; introducing ethical and social issues; and helping them to plan for their own personal and professional development.
Students negotiate their learning options from a range of compulsory and optional topics including ethics and social responsibility; industrial relations; workplace, health and safety; and the culture of engineering. Tasks include preparing job application letters, employment interviewing, learning style assessment, an ethics case study and an industrial relations case study.

Assessment is essentially formative to assist students in achieving an acceptable level. However, students are not able to undertake the first engineering experience internship until they have passed all the compulsory components of this subject.

Engineering Practice Preparation 2 (41045)

This latter-stage undergraduate subject assists students to develop as professional engineers and supports preparation for the second stage of the Engineering Practice Program. Through participation in six workshops students develop and demonstrate their understanding of employment-related processes; ethical decision-making; social responsibility; opportunities for leadership and ‘followership’; and the complexities of workplace culture.
The workshops offer a range of collaborative and experiential learning activities in which students actively engage with their peers, reflect on their learning and refine their communication skills. Students review their past practice and consider their future development needs against the requirements of the Australian Engineering Competency Standards. Reflective practice is embedded throughout the subject to foster the development of students’ strategies for continued professional development and lifelong learning.

Engineering Practice Preview 2 (48141)

This latter-stage undergraduate subject assists students to develop as professional engineers and supports preparation for the second stage of the Engineering Practice Program. Through participation in six workshops students develop and demonstrate their understanding of employment-related processes; ethical decision-making; social responsibility; opportunities for leadership and ‘followership’; and the complexities of workplace culture.
The workshops offer a range of collaborative and experiential learning activities in which students actively engage with their peers, reflect on their learning and refine their communication skills appropriate for professional engineering practice. Students review their past practice and consider their future development needs against the requirements of the Australian Engineering Competency Standards. Reflective practice is embedded throughout the subject to foster the development of students’ strategies for continued professional development and lifelong learning.

Engineering Practice Reflection 1 (41038)

This subject guides students through a review of their first cycle of engineering practice and experiential learning outcomes; the latter arising in part from UTS-directed exploration of themes permeating professional practice. In group sessions, students reflect on individually-declared learning outcomes and evidence of their foundations in theory (formal study), practice (workplace experience) and personal choices. Specifically, students are urged to recognise experiential learning as a life-long imperative, to establish it as an enabling discipline while studying, and to claim its possibilities in all settings.
Students also reflect on common workplace challenges, and are assisted to develop professional responses. The diversity of workplace experiences reported by students is highlighted and respected. On a personal level, the subject requires students to demonstrate their developing appreciation of professional engineering competencies, under measures applied by Engineers Australia. Students reflect individually on their technical and professional progress, as a ‘learning journey’. This learning is documented for peer and professional review.

Since each student’s work experience is unique, all students benefit. Amid the inherent diversity of engineering internships, this subject enables all students to deepen their understanding of professional practice. Emphasis is placed on the diverse and changing nature of engineering workplaces; workplace cultures; employment opportunities and processes; ethics and social responsibility; communication and documentation; technology evolution and innovation; engineering methodology; occupational health and safety; and industrial relations. An emerging critique of practice, built partly on workplace learning, has to be demonstrated by all students.

Engineering Practice Reflection 2 (41048)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Practice Review 2 (48142)

Engineering Practice Review 2 helps students to develop as professional engineers by reflecting on their workplace practice and documenting their learning for peer and professional review. Since each student’s work experience is unique, all students benefit from sharing and discussing their experiences. However, this subject assists all students to appreciate the dimensions of professional engineering workplace practice, including: engineering in a global environment, organisational behaviour, commercial practice, industrial relations and human resource issues, ethics and social responsibility, communication and documentation, the extension and application of engineering knowledge, occupational health and safety, industrial relations, and personal and professional development and recognition.

Engineering Professional Experience 1 (41036)

This subject is essentially a ‘placeholder’ for students while they are working in industry or the community for the purpose of the first of their two engineering internships. Students are required to be enrolled in Work Integrated Learning 1 as a co-requisite to this subject.

Engineering Professional Experience 2 (41046)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Engineering Research Preparation (41029)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to learn and understand different methods that can be undertaken to successfully complete an engineering professional project or a graduate research project. In this subject students are expected to develop specialised knowledge and attributes that demonstrate their preparedness for further learning or high level professional practice while undertaking a project. Students are expected to use this knowledge to identify gaps and prepare a project proposal related to their field of study or major. Students then communicate their learning through written assignments and a final report encompassing a literature review and a preliminary project proposal.

Engineering Work Experience (41028)

This is a aero-credit-point subject that supports students while they are working in industry or the community for the purpose of gaining experience in the practice of engineering. Through engaging in practice-oriented education and regular reflection, students are provided with the opportunity to discover engineering workplace culture and to develop their basic technical and professional skills. Engineering educators, as well as engineering employers, have long recognised the value of integrating practical experience with academic studies.
Each student’s experience is unique. Employer or host organisations are not expected to provide formal training although some may choose to do so. Students are instead required to become active learners and seek opportunities to fulfil the objectives of this experience module. It is expected that students gain this level of experience early in their academic program. The professional engineering practice stream is based on a preparation subject, a work experience subject and a reflection subject. This is the work experience (middle) subject in the program. This subject involves students observing, practicing and reflecting on their development in basic technical and professional competencies.

Engineering Workplace Reflection (41055)

Successful engineers are able to communicate a professional identity to employers, clients, colleagues and other stakeholders in their work, as well as participate in constructive verbal and written professional communication. This subject provides students with opportunities to develop the ability to communicate their professional identity for the purposes of gaining employment and satisfying Engineers Australia’s requirement that all engineering graduates have a minimum of 12 weeks (or equivalent) professional practice.
Students are guided in the curation of a professional practice portfolio which demonstrates the learning outcomes of this subject and reflects on experience. A viva voce for students to defend the claims presented in their portfolio is also required.

Exchange Elective 1 (Information Technology) (90001)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 2 (Information Technology) (90002)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 3 (Information Technology) (90003)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 4 (Information Technology) (90004)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 5 (Information Technology) (90005)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 6 (Information Technology) (90006)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 7 (Information Technology) (90007)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective 8 (Information Technology) (90008)

Enrolment in this subject indicates that a student has completed an elective subject in information technology as part of the UTS international exchange program. Before outbound exchange students can enrol in this subject, the equivalent subject at the exchange partner university must be approved. For students enrolled in UTS: Information Technology courses, this approval must be sought from their program leader. For non-IT students wishing to study IT electives overseas, this approval must be sought from the UTS: Information Technology international exchange contact person.

Exchange Elective A (99850)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective B (99851)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective C (99852)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective D (99853)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective E (99854)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective F (99859)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective G (99860)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Exchange Elective H (99861)

For further details, contact UTS: Engineering.

Global Mobility A (41017)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to engage in short-term global programs such as Engineers Without Borders study tours, UTS Build: Aboard programs and other pre-approved international activities such as volunteer internships, practicum or entrepreneurship placements.

Global Mobility B (41018)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to engage in short-term global programs such as Engineers Without Borders study tours, UTS Build: Aboard programs and other pre-approved international activities such as volunteer internships, practicum or entrepreneurship placements.

Industrial Water Pollution Control Engineering (42011)

Industrial wastewater treatment is of great importance for the protection of the environment in the context of the modern day world. Industrial wastewaters have often very different characteristics from domestic and municipal wastewaters which make it difficult to successfully treat in a sustainable way. The main objective of this subject is to provide the opportunity for students to understand the principles of industrial wastewater treatment, disposal and reuse in order to minimise pollution in a sustainable manner.
To get an in-depth understanding of the treatment and disposal of industrial wastewater, this subject commences with classification, characterisation and quantification of industrial wastes. The subject focuses on the principles and mechanisms of pollutant removal, the processes and design of conventional (primary, secondary and tertiary) and advanced (post-treatment) technologies applied in the treatment of industrial effluent. Various environmental management concepts relating to industrial pollution, prevention/pollution reduction at source, Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD), and cleaner production are covered. Special emphasis is given to water conservation and recycling since these allow more flexibility and have economic value as a water supply.

The subject includes various management practices of industrial waste, i.e. environmental auditing, trade waste policy, environmental rules and legislation and license agreements. Therefore, the subject brings both engineering and management together to prevent and reduce the pollution created by the industrial sector.

Professional Practice (BE) (48100)

Successful professional engineers are able to communicate a professional identity to employers, clients, colleagues and other stakeholders in their work, and participate in constructive verbal and written professional communication. This subject provides students with opportunities to develop their ability to communicate their professional identity for the purpose of gaining employment and satisfying Engineers Australia’s requirement that all engineering graduates have a minimum of 12 weeks (or equivalent) of professional practice.
Students are guided in the curation of a professional practice portfolio that demonstrates the learning outcomes of this subject and reflects on experience. A viva voce for students to defend the claims presented in their portfolios is also required.

Special Course A (6cp) (49086)

This subject offers students maximum educational opportunity to benefit from short courses and other learning experiences available through the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. Enrolment for credit is approved by the director, teaching and learning. Approval requires demonstration by the candidate to the director of a special learning need or development opportunity consistent with the other requirements of the candidate’s program.

Special Course B (6cp) (49096)

This subject offers students maximum educational opportunity to benefit from short courses and other learning experiences available through the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. Enrolment for credit is approved by the director, teaching and learning. Approval requires demonstration by the candidate to the director of a special learning need or development opportunity consistent with the other requirements of the candidate’s program.

Systems Engineering for Managers (49004)

In the multidisciplinary process of problem solving in engineering, systems engineering is seen as a unifying discipline. Drawing on contemporary scholarship and best practice, the philosophy, concepts, techniques and tools of the systems engineering process are examined in the context of engineering management, and their domain of applicability explored. This subject provides extensive opportunity for individual and group encounter with the challenges of the systems approach, and is illustrated by case studies presented by guest lecturers.

Work Integrated Learning 1 (41037)

This subject is designed to enhance and broaden the experiential learning of students concurrently with their internship. Students employed in a particular organisation typically experience a relatively narrow range of tasks and professional culture within that organisation. Through a series of compulsory and optional elective modules in this subject, students broaden their experience and understanding of professional practice in the context of their chosen field of practice.

Work Integrated Learning 2 (41047)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html