Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Aboriginal Sydney Now (013992)

Engaging with contemporary Indigenous culture and seeing Sydney in a new way–if this is something that captures your interest, then Aboriginal Sydney Now should definitely be on your radar. Developed by the Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, Aboriginal Sydney Now focuses on Aboriginal Sydney as a means for exploring current and historical ideas about culture, country and community. By participating in this subject, you will gain a deeper understanding of Indigenous professional capability – a knowledge that will prove valuable throughout your studies and your career.

Aboriginal Sydney Now (013993)

Engaging with contemporary Indigenous culture and seeing Sydney in a new way–if this is something that captures your interest, then Aboriginal Sydney Now should definitely be on your radar. Developed by the Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges, Aboriginal Sydney Now focuses on Aboriginal Sydney as a means for exploring current and historical ideas about culture, country and community. By participating in this subject, you will gain a deeper understanding of Indigenous professional capability – a knowledge that will prove valuable throughout your studies and your career.

Arguments, Evidence and Intuition (36200)

This subject promotes development of numeracy, quantitative literacy and critical thinking skills. Informed citizens need these skills to participate in discussion of significant issues in culture and society. Using primary research materials, governmental reports, stories, and claims drawn from current media and other sources, participants analyse and identify key features of numerical data and graphical illustrations used to support argument.
By examining the ways that quantitative data can be collected, used and abused as evidence for supporting argument, participants have an opportunity to develop habits of mind and lifelong learning skills that can be applied to the questions that should be asked, as informed citizens, of arguments and the supporting data. Participants apply their skills to construct a narrative that uses graphical and numerical data to tell a story, or support an argument, based on the principles explored in the subject.

Arguments, Evidence and Intuition (36201)

This subject promotes development of numeracy, quantitative literacy and critical thinking skills. Informed citizens need these skills to participate in discussion of significant issues in culture and society. Using primary research materials, governmental reports, stories, and claims drawn from current media and other sources, participants analyse and identify key features of numerical data and graphical illustrations used to support argument.
By examining the ways that quantitative data can be collected, used and abused as evidence for supporting argument, participants have an opportunity to develop habits of mind and lifelong learning skills that can be applied to the questions that should be asked, as informed citizens, of arguments and the supporting data. Participants apply their skills to construct a narrative that uses graphical and numerical data to tell a story, or support an argument, based on the principles explored in the subject.

Impossibilities to Possibilities (81539)

In this subject, participants engage in a creative series of practical activities that bring them to a broad understanding of creative intelligence and innovation as a field of practice. Through exploring what first seem to be impossibilities, they begin to investigate and reframe complex challenges, and experiment with new opportunities. Participants are challenged to analyse problem situations from multiple perspectives and to integrate these findings in ways that lead to new possibilities. Their first-hand experience in this subject of the nature of today’s open, complex, dynamic and networked problems inspires them to experiment and hone their skills in multidisciplinary team collaboration, visualisation, representation and presentation.