Catching up on one of your Law subjects during the summer session may assist you in staying on track with your degree. If you feel like you’re on track but would like to spread your workload more evenly throughout the year, why not consider taking a subject during summer so that you can enjoy a calmer pace during the upcoming session.

The Faculty of Law will be hosting 28 subjects throughout Summer at UTS, with opportunities for students to study areas that are currently hot topics and in public debate. Students will have the option to explore and focus on conceptual and historical issues arising from prosecutions, and examine the economic and legal principles of competition law and consumer law. This just touches on the surface of what the Faculty of Law will be offering during Summer at UTS. Find out more.

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Applied Company Law (79014)

This subject is designed for business students to provide them with a sound understanding of fundamental aspects of company law and regulations as they apply to the modern company. Students learn to identify the legal issues, liabilities and risk which may arise in their business practice and solutions to minimise legal risk. This subject emphasises the realities of the company in a changing commercial world, and how the Australian legal framework has evolved in response to political and socioeconomic change.
Through seminar discussion questions and hypothetical legal problem questions, students follow the progression of the modern company life cycle, from its startup and the possibilities of alternative business structures; expansion to a limited liability company, including the laws that govern the external and internal relationship between the company and its directors and shareholders; the directors’ and officers’ duties and the role of corporate regulators; the raising of equity and debt; company accounts and audit; and finally companies in difficulty and the end of the company life cycle.

This subject is taught from a student-centred perspective where student responsibility for their learning is an essential component. Learning involves active engagement with the subject’s content through podcasts, seminars and a range of online exercises.

Applied Human Fieldwork Placement (78293)

This subject involves a placement with 40K Globe together with academic learning about human rights law, and social and economic rights in particular. 40K Globe is a unique internship that offers students the chance to spend one month in rural India helping local villagers develop a sustainable solution for better access to education and employment. Students work in teams with students from other faculties and universities on a social impact project provided by 40K Globe in consultation with local communities.
This subject links the study of human rights law with the practical implementation of social and economic rights, and the right to development. This equips students with an understanding of and critical thinking about the role and value of human rights in the context of a developing country. It also promotes cross-cultural awareness, adaptability and collaborative practices, and encourages self-awareness and ethical behaviour. The subject, like other internship subjects, provides a valuable supplement to students’ academic program that can enrich and enliven the classroom experience. As an international practical subject it also prepares students for global professional practice, particularly in the development and human rights fields.

The subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of ethical judgment, critical reflection and professional responsibility through the following three components: self-study – through selected readings students examine certain topics of relevance to the practical component (the right to development, economic and social rights, and the practice of human rights), providing both a fundamental level of knowledge in each area and the ability to apply that knowledge to their experience in the field practical experience – four-week 40K Globe program where students work on a social impact project focused on health, education, employment, energy, food, water or other specific needs reflective journal – students consider the application of their legal knowledge to their practical experience by writing a critical reflection based on the first two components of the subject.

Applied Human Rights Fieldwork (76099)

This subject involves a placement with 40K Globe together with academic learning about human rights law, and social and economic rights in particular. 40K Globe is a unique internship that offers students the chance to spend one month in rural India helping local villagers develop a sustainable solution for better access to education and employment. Students work in teams with students from other faculties and universities on a social impact project provided by 40K Globe in consultation with local communities.
This subject links the study of human rights law with the practical implementation of social and economic rights, and the right to development. This equips students with an understanding of and critical thinking about the role and value of human rights in the context of a developing country. It also promotes cross-cultural awareness, adaptability and collaborative practices, and encourages self-awareness and ethical behaviour. The subject, like other internship subjects, provides a valuable supplement to students’ academic program that can enrich and enliven the classroom experience. As an international practical subject it also prepares students for global professional practice, particularly in the development and human rights fields.

The subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of ethical judgment, critical reflection and professional responsibility through the following three components: self-study – through selected readings students examine certain topics of relevance to the practical component (the right to development, economic and social rights, and the practice of human rights), providing both a fundamental level of knowledge in each area and the ability to apply that knowledge to their experience in the field practical experience – four-week 40K Globe program where students work on a social impact project focused on health, education, employment, energy, food, water or other specific needs reflective journal – students consider the application of their legal knowledge to their practical experience by writing a critical reflection based on the first two components of the subject.

Australian Civil Liberties Law (76074)

Civil liberties are basic rights and freedoms arising from, and granted to, citizens of a country through constitutional law, the common law or statute. They may also have recognition in international human rights law and include freedom from arbitrary arrest and detention; freedom of speech, assembly and association; freedom of religion; and freedom from discrimination (the right to equality). This subject develops students’ understanding of the fundamentals of civil liberties and human rights in Australia by examining the role, scope and interaction of international human rights law; the Commonwealth Constitution; the common law; and the laws of the Commonwealth, states and territories.
Specific topics considered in this subject include the philosophies and principles which shape Australian civil liberties; the role of federal, state and territory laws in protecting or limiting individual liberties; the institutions established to protect liberties and legal issues arising from their operation; the development of liberties at common law; Australia’s commitments under international conventions and treaties; and issues arising from contemporary social and political conditions.

Students explore aspects of international human rights law, Commonwealth, state and territory laws, analyse legal provisions, and develop a deeper understanding of the interactions between governments and individuals. They learn the language and skills of civil liberties lawyers, including how to identify legal issues concerning human rights; research related legal questions; and approach solving legal problems concerning civil liberties.

Climate Law and Carbon Markets (76041)

This subject examines climate change: one of the most pressing environmental problems of our era. It is a major business issue that is affecting law, policy and corporate behaviour. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that to avoid irreversible harm to the planet, we must stabilise greenhouse gas emissions. This will involve a significant and rapid reduction in ‘business as usual’ behaviours and require unprecedented cooperation at the international level with innovative national responses.
This subject examines the potential role of the international and policy communities as well as the legal and business communities in confronting climate law. It analyses the existing and emerging legal rules and frameworks, both internationally and in Australia, alongside the impacts of these on business and the response from industry. Students critically evaluate the incentives for firms to comply and over-comply with environmental laws and participate in voluntary programs, as well as the role of business in adaptation measures and climate justice issues.

This subject is taught using intensive seminars to enable students to immerse themselves in this exciting field of legal research. It provides students with an early overview of the law and issues in the field, followed by time for in-depth research. In class, learning builds on individual preparation, with class discussions and student co-facilitation forming the basis of each seminar session.

Students practice their oral communication skills in collaboration with their peers, then take responsibility for presenting a topic and leading a discussion exploring options and solutions as a group. In addition, a major research task provides students with practice and feedback on an in-depth exploration of a topic of interest, building their research skills in this dynamic field.

Commercial Law (70327)

In this subject, students develop an understanding of commercial law. They examine concepts of personal property relevant to commercial law including concepts relating to possession, title and security interests in personal property. Commercial law covers transactions involving personal property including sales or leases, which may also be financed by borrowing.
The subject also examines the application of specific legislation relating to sale of goods, security interests in personal property and consumer protection. Student statutory interpretation skills are reinforced through examination of relevant legislation. The subject also examines how international aspects of transactions are dealt with in domestic and international law.

This subject is taught from a student-centred perspective, with an emphasis on statutory interpretation and case analysis, which may involve lectures, seminars and online learning activities. Reading and discussion are focused on Australian law and cases.

Companies and Securities Law (77947)

This subject explores company law in its applied context, addressing the needs of business practitioners and professionals such as accountants. The subject comprises four main sections. The first examines the principal provisions affecting the formation and operation of companies. The second concerns the main roles, responsibilities and duties of corporate directors, officers and other employees. The third considers the protection of shareholders, from the process of corporate fundraising through to the issue of new share capital; this section also looks at measures to protect creditors through provisions concerning the maintenance of share capital. The final section contains an introduction to securities regulation and deals with other major events in the corporate lifecycle such as external administration and takeovers.
Specific topics covered in the subject include: the framework of Australian corporations legislation and the role of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission; the process of company registration and its consequences; the range of legal forms of association available for the conduct of business enterprise; the corporate constitution; the company’s liability in contract and under criminal law; the allocation of responsibility between shareholders, directors and company officers; directors’ and officers’ duties and liabilities; minority shareholder protection and remedies; the regulation of major equity capital transactions such as capital reductions, share buy-backs and dividend payments; an introduction to the legal structure of securities market regulation; corporate fundraising; prospectus disclosure obligations and liabilities; external administration of failing companies; voluntary administration, receivership, liquidation and winding up.

an introduction to takeovers law.

The subject seeks to provide an overview of corporate law in Australia highlight the roles, responsibilities and duties of key personnel involved in corporations develop skills in identifying, analysing and understanding corporate legal problems, and build an appreciation of the commercial implications of the legal framework in which corporations operate.

Competition and Consumer Law (79032)

This subject provides a comprehensive and engaging examination of the economic and legal principles of competition law (also known as antitrust law or restrictive trade practices law). and consumer law (also known as deceptive trade practices law) in Australia. It examines statute law, Part IV and Schedule 2 of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (CCA) (formerly the Trade Practices Act (TPA) 1974), the decisions of the common law courts in interpreting the Act, as well as some international treaties on antitrust and consumer law enforcement, of which Australia is a party.
Current issues and recent cases on competition and consumer laws and policies in Australia are also examined. The subject covers the economic functioning of markets; the relationship between the competition and consumer laws (including both statute law and common law) and economics; the evolution and objectives of Australian competition law and consumer law; and the administration and enforcement of competition law and consumer law, both nationally and internationally.

This subject includes three parts. Part I focuses on competition law. It covers the evolution of competition law; the legislative feature of the Australian competition law; major anti-competitive conduct in Part IV of the CCA, such as monopolistic agreements, misuse of market power, mergers/acquisitions; and enforcement issues in Australia, including authorisation and notification regimes, remedies and other related matters. Part II focuses on consumer law. It covers the policy objective of consumer law; general prohibitions in Schedule 2 of the CCA, such as misleading or deceptive conduct, unconscionable conduct, and unfair contract terms; as well as enforcement issues. Part III examines major international treaties on consumer protection and competition enforcement, and some major international cases in which Australia is involved.

Contemporary Business Law (79708)

This subject provides students with an understanding of the legal system and a knowledge of a range of legal topics that are of practical relevance to business law. It provides timely information on recent developments in areas including commercial contracts and trade practices legislation, consumer protection, business structures and intellectual property.

Deceptive Trade Practices (78123)

This subject examines deceptive trade practices law in Australia, including the meaning of trade and commerce, the meaning of misleading or deceptive conduct, and the remedies available where there has been misleading or deceptive conduct.

Deceptive Trade Practices (78181)

This subject examines in detail the statutory action of misleading and deceptive conduct within the meaning of section 18 of the Australian Consumer Law (ACL). Section 18 is contravened where a defendant engages in conduct that is likely to deceive in trade and commerce. Because the remedies under the ACL are more flexible, more far reaching and usually easier to establish than remedies available at common law or in equity, legal practitioners tend to rely on the statutory action of misleading and deceptive conduct as an alternative to traditional claims based on common law or equitable breaches of the general law.
In this subject, students analyse cases dealing with the meaning of the phrases ‘in trade and commerce’ and ‘misleading or deceptive conduct’ and how loss or damage is assessed. The application of the law to all the facts and circumstances is stressed. A distinction is drawn between cases involving competitors, rivals and political opponents and cases involving parties in contractual relationships such as vendors and their agents versus purchasers; finance providers and their agents versus borrowers; and, landlords and their agents versus tenants. Silence, promises, predictions and representations about future matters as misleading or deceptive conduct are also examined in depth.

Students examine the causal nexus between a contravention of section 18 of the ACL and any loss or damage suffered. Has the claimant relied on the misleading or deceptive conduct? Has the claimant’s reliance been a cause of his, her or its loss? What is the effect on a claimant who, although misled or deceived has failed to take reasonable care? Finally, the remedies available under the ACL are examined in detail.

Global Professional Experience Project (78295)

Internship subjects enable students to apply their academic learning to a professional context and in so doing, produce better equipped legal graduates. Internships undertaken overseas have the additional benefit of exposing students to legal practice in a global context. This subject provides students with an opportunity to gain international and practical legal experience so as to develop professional skills through ‘real-world’ legal work. The subject teaches students to reflect on their practical learning and its relationship to their academic education and legal skills. An internship is an invaluable workplace supplement to a student’s academic program and can help to enrich and enliven the classroom experience.
The international experience promotes crosscultural awareness, adaptability and resourcefulness and encourages students to think of themselves as future global professionals. This subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of self-management, critical reflection and professional responsibility through their participation in the internship and pre-departure preparations, their critical reflection and their debriefing presentation. The subject requires a placement with an international host organisation that can be arranged in two ways. Either, the Faculty provides placements over July (Spring session) or December/January/February (Summer session), ordinarily for four weeks.

Alternatively, students can apply to have a project they have organised independently approved by the Faculty. Students can view the available placements and the application form on the Faculty website. The website and application form explain what is required for application and how students are selected for placements or self-arranged internships.

History and Theory of Intellectual Property (78238)

This subject covers selected topics in the history and theory of intellectual property. It gives students a background in the historical development of the areas of copyright, patents, trademarks and trade secrets law, as well as approaching important questions from jurisprudence, philosophy and legal theory in light of their application to intellectual property law.
Students engage in reading and discussion of key texts in the fields of property theory, law and economics and natural rights theory. Through selected case studies, students consider how the law has developed; the effects of social, cultural and political factors; as well as the application of legal theory to aspects of legal doctrine.

Students develop important skills in critical thinking and writing as part of these investigations and in formulating their own responses to questions such as: Is intellectual property really ‘property’? How long should intellectual property rights last? What is the relationship between intellectual property law and creativity or innovation? Is intellectual property infringement the same as ‘theft’ or ‘piracy’? The aim is for students to develop their theoretical and historical understanding of law by reference to the dynamic and contested field of intellectual property.

International Criminal Law (78010)

The subject analyses international criminal law, with particular focus on conceptual and historical issues arising from prosecutions for international atrocities, the establishment of international criminal authority, and the legalisation of ‘justice’. The subject charts the origins of international criminal law from the post-war settlements of Versailles, and the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, to national-level prosecutions of international crimes and the establishment of international tribunals.
The subject examines international criminal law by assessing its purported objectives; its claims to provide redress, historical narrative (or memory) and deterrence, in light of its substantive achievements and failures, and its continued progress in the contemporary world. The subject examines the core crimes set out in the Rome Statute (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression), and analyses the function of the principal international institutions, the ad hoc tribunals, the International Criminal Court, and the ‘hybrid’ tribunals.

Additionally, the subject covers important foundational and doctrinal questions such as jurisdiction and immunities, extended modes of criminal responsibility and circumstances precluding liability. Students have the opportunity to explore in depth a number of areas of interest in the field, including torture, terrorism and corporate complicity in international crimes. Through the maintenance of an ongoing case file on a real-life situation currently before the International Criminal Court, as well as the presentation of submissions for a mock indictment before that court, students gain technical legal competence as well as a deep, practical understanding of the promise and pitfalls of the modern international criminal justice project.

International Criminal Law (78154)

The subject provides an overview of international criminal law, with particular focus on conceptual and historical issues arising from prosecutions for international atrocities, the establishment of international criminal authority, and the legalisation of ‘justice’. The subject charts the origins of international criminal law from the post-war settlements of Versailles, and the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, to national-level prosecutions of international crimes and the establishment of international tribunals.
The subject examines international criminal law by assessing its purported objectives: its claims to provide redress, historical narrative (or memory) and deterrence, in light of its substantive achievements and failures, and its continued progress in the contemporary world. The subject examines the core crimes set out in the Rome Statute (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression), and examines the function of the principal international institutions, the ad hoc tribunals, the International Criminal Court, and the ‘hybrid’ tribunals.

Additionally, the subject covers important foundational and doctrinal questions such as jurisdiction and immunities, extended modes of criminal responsibility and circumstances precluding liability. Finally, students have the opportunity to explore in depth a number of areas of interest in the field, including torture, terrorism and corporate complicity in international crimes.

International Legal Internship (76098)

Internship subjects enable students to apply their academic learning to a professional context and in so doing, produce better equipped legal graduates. Internships undertaken overseas have the additional benefit of exposing students to legal practice in a global context. This subject provides students with an opportunity to gain international and practical legal experience so as to develop professional skills through ‘real-world’ legal work. The subject teaches students to reflect on their practical learning and its relationship to their academic education and legal skills.
An internship is an invaluable workplace supplement to a student’s academic program and can help to enrich and enliven the classroom experience. The international experience promotes crosscultural awareness, adaptability and resourcefulness and encourages students to think of themselves as future global professionals.

This subject is taught at master’s level. Students achieve the advanced subject learning outcomes of self-management, critical reflection and professional responsibility through their participation in the internship as well as their pre-departure preparations, their critical reflection and their debriefing presentation. The subject requires a placement with an international host organisation that can be arranged in two ways. Either, the Faculty provides placements over July (Spring session) or December/January/February (Summer session), ordinarily for four weeks.

Alternatively, students can apply to have a project they have organised independently approved by the Faculty. Students can view the available placements and the application form on the Faculty website. The website and application form explain what is required to apply and how students are selected for placements or self-arranged internships.

International Organisations (78206)

The proliferation of intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations is one indicator of the internationalisation of social life and the interdependence of states in the early 21st century. This subject examines the principal legal issues concerning organisations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organisations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities and finally the organisations’ privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the subject addresses real-world problems such as: the creation of international criminal courts; the ‘succession’ of Russia to the USSR’s seat on the UN Security Council; the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia; the jurisdictional issues in the Lockerbie-case; the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council; the success of the WTO dispute settlement; NATO action against Serbia in 1999; the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11; and the UN administration of Kosovo and East Timor.

Primary consideration is given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal organisations such as ILO, the Bretton Woods institutions, WTO or ICAO, as well as regional ones such as the Council of Europe, the EU and others are also dealt with. This subject does not try to provide a comprehensive picture of all of these organisations, rather it aims to help students understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.

International Organisations (78207)

The proliferation of intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations is one indicator of the internationalisation of social life and the interdependence of states in the early 21st century. This subject examines the principal legal issues concerning organisations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organisations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities and finally the organisations’ privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the subject addresses real-world problems such as: the creation of international criminal courts; the ‘succession’ of Russia to the USSR’s seat on the UN Security Council; the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia; the jurisdictional issues in the Lockerbie-case; the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council; the success of the WTO dispute settlement; NATO action against Serbia in 1999; the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11; and the UN administration of Kosovo and East Timor.

Primary consideration is given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal organisations such as ILO, the Bretton Woods institutions, WTO or ICAO, as well as regional ones such as the Council of Europe, the EU and others are also dealt with. This subject does not try to provide a comprehensive picture of all of these organisations, rather it aims to help students understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.

Introduction to Law (70110)

The subject is designed to provide students from a range of disciplines with a fundamental understanding of the Australian legal system and the areas of law particularly relevant to business. Its objective is for students to develop an understanding of the Australian legal framework and the role of law in regulating individual and commercial relationships and to provide a basis for undertaking further studies in law.
The subject is structured to cover 11 topics, comprising eight topics addressing learning about the Australian legal system and the civil, criminal and business relationships it regulates, and three topics covering international law. Topics 1-8 introduce students to the Australian legal system and help them understand the operation of Australian law. These topics aim to equip students with a foundational understanding of the operation of the Australian legal system to enable an effective transition into the more specialised learning involved with Topics 9-11. Topics 9-11 explore Australian law in an international context.

Introduction to Taxation Law (77938)

This subject acquaints students with Australian taxation law in a practical business environment. The focus of the syllabus is on the application of tax law concepts in a professional accounting setting. It aims to develop students’ conceptual and analytical skills and give them an appreciation of the Australian tax system. It provides a general analysis of the current tax system and consideration of the many changes it is presently undergoing with an emphasis on the implications for the commercial world.
The subject looks at the Income Tax Assessment Act, the Tax Law Reform Project and the New Tax System. Particular concepts to be considered include: taxable income, income, deductions, capital gains tax, trusts, partnerships, companies and shareholders, tax accounting, tax planning and anti-avoidance provisions, fringe benefits tax, and goods and services tax.

Jessup International Moot (76039)

This elective encourages participation in the Jessup International Moot. The moot is organised by the Association of Student International Law Societies, which operates under the auspices of the American Society of International Law in Washington. The workload involved is particularly demanding: the problems circulated are on complex and current issues of international law. Detailed research into both international and comparative law is essential to prepare complex pleadings for both sides with a maximum size prescribed. The work involved is certainly no less than that for a large research project. The memorials are assessed by memorial judges, often including distinguished teachers of international law.
In addition, there is the opportunity to present oral submissions in the four preliminary rounds. The top eight teams move on to the final rounds. Because of the rules of the Jessup Moot, no assessment is available until after the conclusion of the Australian finals of the Jessup Moot each year.

Law and Literature (76902)

In this subject, students examine literary and legal responses to violence and trauma. The purpose of this examination is for students to understand and apply complex concepts that are drawn from the interdisciplinary areas of law and the humanities.
Students engage in a rigorous process of reading and discussion that includes some of the most fascinating and thought provoking literary works of the present, and of the 20th century, as well as judgments and other legal documents. Using these texts, students think about questions of justice related to central problems and traumas of recent times: the Holocaust, family violence, slavery and the Stolen Generations. Students use their readings of legal and literary texts to respond to questions about the role of law in adjudicating suffering and violence.

Students apply advanced critical skills of analysis, research, communication and critical thinking; learning to not only evaluate and synthesise information, but also to critique legal and academic arguments. Students develop their capacity to communicate understanding of the concepts and critiques of the materials by presenting their ideas in lectures and seminars and providing peer feedback in weekly online activities.

Legal and Professional Skills (75424)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the competency standards set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer. It is complemented by the other three Practical Legal Training (PLT) subjects: Transactional Practice, Litigation and Estate Practice and Practical Experience.
The practice of law requires an understanding of the legislative and regulatory environment in which the legal profession operates. The integration of practical and theoretical approaches to legal ethics and legal practice provides a basis from which students can better integrate ethical priorities within their own moral compass, and develop personal priorities around resilience.

Students apply their legal skills and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of legal practitioners, including obligations relating to a solicitor’s trust account. Participation in drafting, interviewing and negotiation workshops and in online discussions enables students to practise essential skills in a client focused environment. The weekly activities also provide practical scenarios in which students can better understand how conduct rules apply in a professional context and the operation and application of trust accounting procedures. Students also develop and reflect on the targeted graduate attributes including the application of resilience strategies for personal benefit and in the workplace environment.

Litigation and Estate Practice (75423)

This subject encourages students to experience and reflect on the targeted graduate attributes developed by the faculty. The subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015.
The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.

This subject is one of four subjects that constitute the Practical Legal Training (PLT) program. It is complemented by the three other PLT subjects: Legal and Professional Skills, Transactional Practice and Practical Experience. The subject has three components: civil litigation wills and estate practice, and family law practice or criminal law practice.

Moot (76900)

UTS: Law offers students the opportunity to participate in a variety of mooting competitions, both within Australia and overseas. Students enrol in this subject in cases where participation in a mooting team is counted as credit towards their degree. UTS: Law calls for expressions of interest from students to participate in a variety of moot competitions.

Patent Law (77898)

This subject provides an understanding of the principles of patents and the patent system in Australia. Patents have been the subject of much controversy in recent times: biotechnology challenges our traditional distinction between nature and invention; the health demands of developing countries come into conflict with the private interests of patent owners; the use of traditional knowledge of Indigenous communities in biodiscovery processes can complicate the availability of patent protection; the computer software industry demands patent protection to supplement their rights in copyright; and in a growing number of cases patents can be granted for ‘business methods’.
In this subject, students are introduced to the law of patents: what is patentable subject matter; what are the threshold requirements of patentability; what level of disclosure is required to justify the grant of the patentee’s monopoly rights (section 40 of the federal Patents Act 1990); the rights of the patent holder; exploitation of patent rights; and actions for infringement. In addition, special issues relating to biotechnology patents and the international context in which Australia’s patent law operates are considered. There is some attention to plant breeders’ rights and the law relating to breach of confidence.

Students develop legal knowledge and analytical skills through problem-solving activities that mirror the legal and factual issues that arise in legal and business practice. These activities provide opportunities for students to develop commercial skills and become solution-focused practitioners. The subject builds students’ skills of critical analysis and oral communication through discussion of different theoretical, jurisprudential and policy issues underlying areas of patent law. Students also undertake research that enables them to critically evaluate laws, practices and policies. The subject combines a practical with a theoretical approach, enriching students’ understanding of the complex public and private interests at play, and preparing them for careers in professional practice or general commerce.

Patent Law (78190)

This subject provides an understanding of the principles of patents and the patent system in Australia. Topics covered include subject matter, section 40 of the Patents Act 1990 (specifications), infringement, inventorship, ownership and breach of confidence.
Patents have been the subject of much controversy in recent times. Biotechnology challenges our traditional distinction between nature and invention; the health demands of developing countries come into conflict with the private interest of patent owners; the use of traditional knowledge of indigenous communities in biodiscovery processes can complicate the availability of patent protection; US pharmaceutical companies demand a greater role in determining what drugs should be available under Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme; the computer software industry demands patent protection to supplement their rights in copyright; and in a growing number of cases patents can be granted for ‘business methods’.

In this subject, students are introduced to the law of patents – what is patentable subject matter, what are the threshold requirements of patentability, what level of disclosure is required to justify the grant of the patentee’s monopoly rights, the rights of the patent holder, exploitation of patent rights, and actions for infringement. In addition, special issues relating to biotechnology patents and the international context in which Australia’s patent law operates are considered. There is some attention to plant varieties rights and the use of the action for breach of confidence to protect trade secrets.

Practical Experience (75411)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Second Schedule to the Legal Profession Uniform Admission Rules 2015. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise the application of this knowledge through the development of skills and reflection in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.
This subject is one of four subjects that constitute the Practical Legal Training (PLT) program. It is a work-integrated subject complemented by the three other PLT subjects: Legal and Professional Skills, Transactional Practice, and Litigation and Estate Practice. This subject enables students to bring together the knowledge of legal practice gained in the complementary PLT subjects and apply their learning in a legal workplace. Students undertake a minimum of 15 weeks of full-time or equivalent part-time work experience in a legal office environment.

This is a zero-credit-point subject that is graded pass/fail. Grading is based on supervisors’ reports as to the competency of students’ practice in their workplaces. To be competent, students must achieve the standard of an entry-level lawyer. Students may enrol in this subject when they enrol in Legal and Professional Skills. Practical Experience placements must be approved in advance by the UTS Faculty of Law Practical Experience Committee and completed in accordance with the Practical Experience Rules. Students must complete their practical experience work placement within two years of enrolling in this subject.

Preparing for Intellectual Property Practice (77905)

This subject introduces students to the: legal systems and intellectual property laws of Australia and New Zealand, professional responsibility for patent and trade marks attorneys; and the commercialisation of intellectual property. Students use this knowledge as a framework to develop skills in critical analysis, critical evaluation and legal writing for intellectual property practice.
The subject is in three parts. Each part has a dedicated online forum where students are invited to discuss and ask any questions that arise as they explore the materials, build skills and test their learning.

Part 1 explores the Australian and New Zealand legal systems, the courts and legislative processes, and the protection of intellectual property rights by local and international legal systems. Students start to apply the skills of statutory interpretation, case analysis and legal writing, and have opportunities to test their learning and obtain feedback on developing skills.

Part 2 explores the rights, privileges and responsibilities of practising patent or trade mark attorneys towards their clients, the profession and the community. Further opportunities are offered for students to test their knowledge and incorporate feedback to further develop their skills.

Part 3 explores the principles involved in the efficient and effective management, commercialisation and exploitation of intellectual property assets together with the legal entities and processes used in licensing, franchising, assignment and securing intellectual property rights.

Students refine their analytical skills and legal writing and receive feedback on their progress. Students use the knowledge and skills gained in this subject in intellectual property and/or law subjects as well as in practice.

Privacy and Surveillance Law (76089)

Issues surrounding privacy and surveillance are attracting increasing attention in contemporary public debate, fuelled, in no small way, by the emergence of new technologies. They are multi-faceted, controversial and challenging. This subject explores key legal and policy questions relating to invasion of personal privacy, data protection and retention, and surveillance of personal conversations, activities and location.
It also tackles emerging issues and challenges prompted, in particular, by the advent of new technologies, including online privacy protection, anonymity/pseudonymity and the right to be forgotten. This necessitates travelling through disrupted legal terrain, formed by a complex mix of common law and statute, federal as well as state/territory laws. It also requires students to engage with a range of perspectives, ideas and interests.

Understanding of key issues is further deepened by interrogating the wider contexts in which privacy and surveillance law operates and is informed, including theoretical, constitutional, policy and international settings. Students are also asked to critically evaluate a range of responses to privacy and surveillance issues including law reform proposals.

Privacy and Surveillance: Law and Policy (78248)

Privacy and surveillance regulation features prominently in contemporary public debate in Australia. It is controversial, dynamic and challenging. This subject explores key legal and policy issues arising in this space. Specifically, it investigates various dimensions of privacy including invasion of personal privacy, data protection and retention, and surveillance of personal conversations, activities and locations.
It also tackles emerging issues and challenges prompted by the advent of new technologies, including online privacy protection, anonymity/pseudonymity and the right to be forgotten. This necessitates travelling through disrupted legal terrain, formed by a complex mix of common law and statute as well as federal and state/territory laws. It also calls for students to engage with a range of relevant perspectives, views and interests.

Understanding of key issues is further deepened by interrogating the wider contexts in which privacy and surveillance law and policy operate and are informed, including theoretical, constitutional, ethical and international contexts. The subject also exposes students to a myriad of ethical dilemmas associated with privacy and surveillance, and enhances their capacity to develop strategies to address such issues.

Taxation Law (79017)

This subject aims to develop students’ conceptual and analytical skills and an appreciation of the Australian tax system. It provides a general analysis of the current tax system and consideration of the many changes it is presently undergoing. The course looks at the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, the Tax Law Reform Project and the New Tax System. Particular concepts to be considered include income and capital, assessable income, allowable deductions, capital gains tax, fringe benefits tax, goods and services tax, trusts, partnerships, tax accounting, tax planning and anti-avoidance provisions.

Transactional Practice (75422)

This subject covers the skills, practice areas and values required of a law student to be admitted to practise law as prescribed by the ‘competency standards’ set out in the Sixth Schedule to the Legal Profession Admission Rules 2005. The subject assumes an understanding of disciplinary knowledge taught in core law subjects in a relevant degree. Students learn and practise tasks in preparation for professional practice as an entry-level lawyer.
This subject focuses on law, practice, procedure and skills to enable students to: conduct and advise on property transactions such as conveying torrens title and strata title residential property; advise on, create and release securities; advise on, create and transfer leases; identify revenue issues of property transactions; advise on land use, powers of attorneys, residential tenancies and options conduct and advise on commercial transactions such as the sale and purchase of a business; set up and advise on business structures and the continuing obligations in relation to those structures; identify revenue implications of commercial transactions and refer clients to appropriate expert advisers; advise on loans, securities and financing arrangements for commercial transactions.

Students also draft relevant documentation and analyse issues in clients’ problems as well as offering options and solutions. The subject encourages students to experience and reflect on the targeted Graduate Attributes developed by the faculty.