The faculty of Science will be offering over 60 subjects during the summer session, ranging from internships through to Human anatomy and physiology. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the intricacies of Mathematical modelling for science, study the vital relationships between microbes and the human world, and even enhance those practical skills that are vital within the field of Science. Take a look at the subject highlights, and browse through this site to see what appeals to you.

Important: If you decide to withdraw from a spring session subject, you will not be able to re-enrol. Please consider this as the summer session class may already be full.

All subjects available.

These subjects will broaden your academic experience and are generally available as electives in your course.Use these subjects to broaden your academic experience. Refer to the UTS handbook for more information.  

Usually available as electives in your course, internships and industry work opportunities are a great way to gain valuable experience and develop your skills while you’re studying. Please check the availability of internship subjects in your course listing in the handbook.

Work experience subjects are a compulsory part of your course. Find out what it’s like to work in your industry whilst gaining relevant knowledge throughout your UTS course.

These subjects have been developed to assist you in improving upon your current skills in various areas that are relevant to your studies. These subjects do not hold a credit point value.

Consider giving your degree a real international edge. Going on Exchange will enhance your understanding of language, culture and context of your chosen country.

HELPS provides non-credit point English language and academic literacy support to UTS undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Learn competencies that will assist you on your career path. Short Courses do not contribute to your current degree, but will provide you with professional skills that can be applied to the real world.

Anatomical Pathology (91402)

This subject is part of an accredited degree and as part of that certification requires specific subject content. Students gain a basic knowledge of disease processes, the body’s responses to them, and the light microscopic appearance of diseased tissues known as general pathology. This knowledge is further enhanced by authentic practice done in the laboratory using different dyes to highlight these disease processes in tissue sections used to assist diagnosis. These practical classes consolidate the learned theory by examining tissue sections with the maladies studied as well as the staining of tissues for specific hallmarks of these tissue disorders to assist in coming to a differential diagnosis. This subject assumes a solid knowledge of histology and basic stain theory learned in 91500 Histology, functions of the human body from 91400 Human Anatomy and Physiology and ties together all previously learned subjects, to present a deeper understanding of how the body responds to injurious stimuli. The graduating student is provided with a skill base to discriminate between normal and diseased tissue required for postgraduate study, work in hospital or private pathology laboratories, as medical representative for pharmaceutical or medical equipment firm or to undertake medical research and forensic investigations of human remains.

Biocomplexity (91123)

The existence of humans on earth has arguably been made possible through the evolution of a vast diversity of biota – to which we are inextricably linked, both directly and indirectly. Earth’s biodiversity is not only extraordinary and fascinating but also fundamental to our ongoing survival. An understanding of the biological complexity of life is an important component underpinning a career in science, irrespective of the chosen scientific profession.
This subject investigates the question: what does it take for life to exist in the range of habitats across the globe? There is considerable variation among living organisms, including humans, in their biology and how they interact with their environment. This subject explores the problems faced by organisms living in different habitats and demonstrates the strategies of plants, animals, fungi, protists, bacteria and archaea that have evolved to cope with the vast array of habitats on earth. The order in which these biota are treated is reflected in the order of the evolution of life, i.e. movement from water to land (and in some cases back again). All major taxa are discussed comparatively to better demonstrate the diversity of evolutionary strategies that have evolved in response to environmental conditions. The subject concludes with considerations of the sustainable use of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria as resources for humans.

Biotechnology Research Project (91539)

In this subject, students undertake a session-long research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. This project is equivalent in level to those undertaken by honours and research master’s students.
The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (10,000-20,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.

Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Biotechnology Research Project B (91538)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Bridging Mathematics (94580)

Maths bridging course.

Chemistry 1 (65111)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Chemistry 2 (65212)

The study of chemistry is central to an understanding of the physical world, and is fundamental to the study of biology, geology and environmental science. This subject builds on and develops further the material introduced in Chemistry 1. The subject is divided into the broad areas of physical chemistry (equilibria, kinetics and thermochemistry) and organic chemistry (carbon compounds and their reactions, including biological molecules such as proteins, sugars and nucleic acids).
The study of physical chemistry allows for the explanation and prediction of chemical reactivity and energetics, while organic chemistry provides the building blocks for understanding the complexity of the natural world.

Clinical Bacteriology (91338)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Directed Study A (60910)

This subject is designed to enhance development of students’ ability to undertake a professionally based scientific project. This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding supervision. Students contribute, in collaboration with their academic and, where relevant, industry supervisor, to the formulation of the project, including planning the work within an appropriate time scale. Students are responsible for appropriate analysis and critical evaluation of the data or information obtained and presentation of their findings in a formal written report. Students should approach potential supervisors in the first instance.
Before enrolment can be approved, the student and supervisor must provide the head of school with a short written project proposal, including assessment criteria and, where the project involves laboratory or field work, a completed risk assessment form. In addition, approval by the subject coordinator is required.

Directed Study B (60911)

This subject is designed to enhance development of a student’s ability to undertake a professionally based scientific project. This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding supervision. Students contribute, in collaboration with their academic supervisor and, where relevant, industry supervisor, to the formulation of the project, including planning the work within an appropriate time scale. Students are responsible for appropriate analysis and critical evaluation of the data or information obtained and presentation of their findings in a formal written report. Students should approach potential supervisors in the first instance.
Before enrolment can be approved, the student and supervisor must provide the head of school with a short written project proposal, including assessment criteria and, where the project involves laboratory or field work, a completed risk assessment form. In addition, approval by the subject coordinator is required.

Environment Research Project B (91546)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Exchange Elective 1 (Science) (99870)

This subject may be placed on a student’s program when going on exchange. For further details, contact UTS: Science.

Forensic Biology Research Project B (91550)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulating the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This should include an introduction, which sets the project in the context of the literature; a description of the methods used; a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken; and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. They may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Foundation Studies (94581)

Foundation Mathematics taken as an enabling subject (non-award), available simultaneously with 35010 Foundation Mathematics (regular ‘for credit’ subject).

General Microbiology (91314)

Microbes are small but they have important relationships with the human world. Although some are involved in food spoilage and a minority are capable of causing disease in humans, animals and plants, many have numerous beneficial effects including maintaining health in our guts (i.e. the microbiome) and maintaining balance in the environment by recycling chemical elements such as carbon and nitrogen. Additionally, microbes have a number of important industrial applications in food and chemical production, bioremediation and sewage treatment. When considering their diverse roles, microbes are an exciting and important group of organisms to learn about.
This subject provides an introduction to the structure, function and taxonomy of the microbial world including bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Several key topics in the study of microbiology are discussed including microscopy, sterilisation, disinfection, microbial nutrition, microbial growth, bacterial identification schemes, as well as antibiotic and anti-microbial agents and contemporary techniques in molecular microbiology. Basic mycology, parasitology, and virology are covered, with an emphasis on transmission control of these organisms. The practical exercises give students experience in the principal laboratory procedures for the isolation, manipulation, growth and identification of microorganisms

Haematology 1 (91563)

This subject is designed to introduce the basic concepts of haematology and their practical application in a modern laboratory. The cells of the blood and bone marrow are studied in detail with regard to their identification, morphology and function. The development of these cells (haematopoesis) and their role in haemostasis and immune function is investigated. Students are also introduced to haematological diseases and the significance of haematological changes in disease. Students study modern laboratory analysers, and their functions and limitations, as well as how to interpret and troubleshoot issues from these automated machines.
The practical sessions introduce students to the variety of manual haematological techniques used in pathology and research laboratories. Students learn how to complete manual haematology tasks and interpret the results they obtain. To develop the skills needed to be a successful scientist in the field, the subject includes a strong focus of haematology morphology via the microscopy needed to make informed clinical interpretations which lead to accurate diagnosis of haematological disorders.

Human Anatomy and Physiology (91400)

In this subject students gain excellent basic knowledge in physiology, putting them in good stead for medical-oriented subjects in subsequent years and potential entrance into the medical and dentistry fields. Students learn the anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) of the healthy human body. Lectures are complemented by a supportive practical/tutorial program. The subject content includes: homeostasis; the anatomical organisation of the body and anatomical terms; and the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary systems. Development of practical skills is a major part of the subject.

Introduction to Statistics (31751)

This subject focuses on data analysis. Students learn how to collect and analyse data, and how to draw valid conclusions from the data. The subject begins with a discussion of how to sample from a population and how to describe the data collected. This is followed by a discussion of how to form and test hypotheses about the population using the data collected from the sample.

Introduction to Statistics (94550)

On demand statistics workshops, with overall duration 7-12 hours.

Mathematical Modelling 2 (33230)

This subject consists of two parts: multivariate calculus and an introduction to statistics. The mathematical part develops the skills required for the mathematical modelling of systems involving more than one independent variable. The statistics part is an introduction to descriptive statistics, statistical inference and simple linear regression.
Topics include linear algebra, solutions to sets of equations resulting from particular problems, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, partial derivatives, optimisation, multiple integrals and their applications, and probability with a focus on the determination of the reliability of a system of components in various engineering contexts.

Mathematical Modelling for Science (33190)

Mathematical modelling is essential in all branches of science. This subject develops the knowledge and skills necessary for problem-solving and mathematical modelling at an introductory level. Topics covered include: vectors and geometry; complex numbers; calculus and its relationship to science; differentiation and integration of functions; inverse, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions; the solution of differential equations with applications to exponential growth and decay and oscillating systems; Taylor series; and an introduction to linear algebra. The computer algebra system Mathematica is used for symbolic, graphical and numerical computations.

Mathematics Preparation for Nursing (94590)

Maths bridging course for nursing and midwifery students.

Mathematics Study 1 (94537)

Foundation Maths course for Education students, e-skills.

Mathematics Study 2 (94538)

Foundation Maths course for Education students, e-skills.

Mathematics Study 3 (94539)

On demand quantitative courses with an overall duration of 24 hours.

Mathematics Tutorial 1 (94534)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Tutorial 2 (94535)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 7-12 hours.

Mathematics Tutorial 3 (94536)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 7-12 hours.

Mathematics Workshop 1 (94531)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration of 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Workshop 2 (94532)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Workshop 3 (94533)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Workshop 4 (94540)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration of 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Workshop 5 (94541)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration of 6 or less hours.

Mathematics Workshop 6 (94542)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration of 6 or less hours.

Metabolic Biochemistry (91320)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Molecular Biology 1 (91132)

This subject provides an introduction to the basics of molecular biology and an understanding of the key concepts underlying the experimental techniques of DNA manipulations in a molecular biology laboratory. The key techniques and the science behind the methodology are introduced, which enables the student to embrace a wide learning curve of elements within the subject. The student is encouraged and challenged to understand ideas and concepts, evaluate and analyse data and information, and apply these skills to creating their own molecular biology material in the assignment tasks.
Topics covered include: DNA and RNA isolation, restriction enzymes, DNA ligation, cloning strategies; southern, northern and western blotting; and an introduction to DNA sequencing and PCR. Emphasis is also placed on the use of databases to retrieve and analyse nucleic acid and protein sequences. This subject encourages students to become adept at the techniques required for molecular analysis in a modern scientific laboratory, and provides a foundation for more advanced molecular biology study, as well as the skills and knowledge for future potential positions in industry, such as pharmaceutical and commercial, research and development, and gene technology and engineering companies.

Numerical Analysis for Quantitative Finance (25852)

This subject presents various numerical methods used in quantitative finance. It provides a rigorous understanding of advanced numerical, statistical and filtering methods. Emphasis is on simulation methods for solving stochastic differential equations, their systematic application and their links to finite difference and other numerical methods.

Numerical Methods of Finance (35366)

This subject presents various numerical methods used in quantitative finance. It provides a rigorous understanding of advanced numerical, statistical and filtering methods. Emphasis is on simulation methods for solving stochastic differential equations, their systematic application and their links to finite difference and other numerical methods.

Optimisation in Quantitative Management (37242)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Organic Chemistry 1 (65202)

This subject introduces students to the reactions characteristic of the common families of carbon compounds and explores the details and implications of the reaction mechanisms involved. A primary objective is for students to gain an appreciation of the relationship of molecular structure to reactivity across a broad range of functional groups.
Students have the opportunity to perform many of these reactions in the laboratory, and to evaluate the success of their experiments by analysis of their reaction products using gas chromatography and infra-red spectroscopy as well as mp, bp and refractive index measurements critically. These are skills required for professional chemists.

Pharmacology 1 (91707)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Physics in Action (68201)

This subject is a foundation for later-stage subjects. In this subject students learn about: electrostatics, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and induction, geometrical optics, physical optics, introductory atomic physics, and quantum theory. Research linked to each of the topic areas, and which is happening within the School of Mathematics and Physical Sciences at UTS, is integrated into this subject.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 1 (91552)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to gain real-world work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. The subject provides approved professional experience in a (bio)medical science service provider laboratory in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
The focus is on the attributes required for a successful job application; orientation to workplace practices; self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs; effective written and oral communication skills; application and extension of knowledge; technology proficiency; and early workplace experiences. The subject aims to introduce students to the major specialties in a pathology or research laboratory, e.g. immunology, microbiology and biochemistry. Students may have the opportunity to rotate through these specialty laboratories or they may be allocated to one specialty for the entire placement. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 2 (91553)

This subject is the second in a series that provides students with the opportunity to gain ‘real-world’ work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. This subject provides approved professional experience within a (bio)medical science service provider, in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
It focuses on the skills and attributes required in a successful application for a job, workplace practices, self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs, effective written and oral communication skills, application and extension of knowledge, and technology proficiency. This subject aims to provide students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge and experience gained through their previous placement and their university studies, in order to further develop as professional scientists. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 3 (91554)

This subject is the third in a series that provides students with the opportunity to gain ‘real-world’ work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. This subject provides approved professional experience within a (bio)medical science service provider, in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
It focuses on the skills and attributes required in a successful application for a job, workplace practices, self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs, effective written and oral communication skills, application and extension of knowledge, and technology proficiency. This subject aims to provide students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge and experience gained through their previous professional placements and their university studies, in order to further develop as professional scientists. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures. This subject may provide students with a competitive advantage for future employment.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science PT A (91557)

This subject provides students with the opportunity to gain real-world work experience in order to prepare them as employment-ready graduates. The subject provides approved professional experience in a biomedical science service provider laboratory in the private or public sector. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the technical, organisational, social, cultural, ethical and legislative dimensions of workplace practice in science.
The focus is on the attributes required for a successful job application; orientation to workplace practices; self-analysis of current skills, attributes and learning needs; effective written and oral communication skills; application and extension of knowledge; technology proficiency; and early workplace experiences. The principal aim of the subject is to provide students with experience-based exposure to the industry of biomedical science, to help students develop as professional scientists. Students learn from their own experiences in a professional setting through reflection on their workplace practices and documentation of their learning. They have the opportunity to devise strategies to fuse their practical experiences with future endeavours, and gain deeper awareness of themselves and their abilities to plan for professional and personal development, providing a competitive advantage for future employment.

The subject may be taken as the first in professional experience or after successful completion of Professional Experience in Biomedical Science 1. Specifics of the placement may differ depending on the sequence of subjects. The student may experience an introduction to several specialities in a pathology laboratory, e.g. microbiology, histology and biochemistry; or the student may focus on one laboratory specialty for the duration of the placement. Students experience the entire business process including work, health and safety; quality assurance and control; sample handling, processing and storage; data reporting; stakeholder interaction; and an overview of technical and experimental procedures.

Professional Experience in Biomedical Science PT B (91558)

For subject description, contact the Faculty of Science.

Professional Science Project (60909)

In this subject, students undertake a short research investigation under the supervision of a member of academic staff. Students contribute, in collaboration with their UTS supervisor and, where appropriate, an industry or external co-supervisor, to formulate the scope of the research project, including planning the research work. The student is responsible for carrying out the work, including appropriate and critical analysis of the data or information obtained, and writing up their findings in a formal written report (7000-15,000 words approx.). This report must include an introduction to the project, a description of the methods used, a presentation of the results obtained, plus any analysis undertaken and a discussion of the results in the context of the relevant literature. Students may also be required to present a seminar to other students, staff and industry or external partners.
Due to supervisory and infrastructure constraints, places in this subject are limited and it can only be undertaken with faculty approval. Students should approach their Program Adviser and potential supervisors about project availability in the first instance. A project proposal, written in consultation with, and signed by the proposed supervisor and countersigned by the Program Adviser must be sent to the Master of Science Course Director for formal approval. Where the project involves laboratory or fieldwork, a completed risk assessment form must also be provided with the approval request. Ethics approval is required for certain projects.

Quantitative Research Support (94582)

On demand quantitative revision and support workshops, with overall duration 24 hours.

Regression Analysis (37252)

Please refer to the UTS Handbook for details http://www.handbook.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html

Science Internship (18cp) (60707)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 300 hours of work. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship (24cp) (60709)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 400 hours of work. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship A (12cp) (60703)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 200 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship A (6cp) (60702)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship B (12cp) (60705)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study. Students must undertake approximately 200 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace through a reflective journal and by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship B (6cp) (60704)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute), or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks, which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences are applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship C (6cp) (60706)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Science Internship D (6cp) (60708)

In this subject, students undertake an internship with an external organisation (e.g. business, external research institute) or UTS unit, department or school, in a capacity relevant to their academic studies. This assists in developing their professional attributes related to employability, discipline knowledge and professional networks which can contribute to their career goals. Through their internship, students are exposed to a subset of the professional functions and activities relevant to their field of study.
Students must undertake approximately 100 hours of work in their professional placement. The specific terms and timeframe of the internship experience may be negotiated as a learning contract between the student and the host organisation in consultation with the subject coordinator. Students develop an appreciation of how education and training in the sciences is applied in a workplace by reporting on the outcomes of their internship. The internship must be based on an agreed and approved program of work which aims to achieve predetermined learning objectives.

Special Reading Subject (69337)

This subject can only be undertaken following prior negotiation on the part of the student with a full-time member of academic staff regarding individual supervision. In addition, special permission of the Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning) is required.

Statistical Design and Analysis (33116)

This subject focuses on data analysis. Students learn how to collect and analyse data, and how to draw valid conclusions from the data. The subject begins with a discussion of how to sample from a population, and how to describe the data collected. This is followed by a discussion of how to form and test hypotheses about the population using the data collected from the sample.

Tissue Engineering Scaffolds (91560)

Tissue engineering is a radical new concept for the treatment of disease and injury. It involves the use of the technologies of molecular and cell biology, combined with those of advanced materials science and processing, in order to produce tissue regeneration. This subject outlines concepts underlying the development of biomaterial scaffolds and tissue engineering-based products and aims to give students a theoretical and practical understanding of the tools available for developing such ‘systems’, as well as the biological, physical and chemical constraints of these systems.
This subject provides an introduction to the characterisation, analysis and design of biomaterials for the purposes of correcting deformities, restoring lost function, or promoting tissue regeneration in the human body. The principles of materials science, specifically the fundamental structure-function relationships of biomaterials, is explored, as they relate to the use of materials in the body. The subject also examines properties of biomaterials as they relate to minimising corrosion, controlling degradation and tailoring cell-material interaction to guide cell growth and tissue regeneration. Topics include structural properties of materials, characterisation of materials, tissue responses to implants, and designing materials for tissue engineering. Laboratory classes are used to allow students to gain practical experience with scaffold design, production and manipulations.